How To Leash Train Your Dog

Training your dog with a leash sounds pretty easy. All you have to do is put the leash on the dog, isn’t it? That’s what non pet owners think. There is more to walking a dog on a leash than just that.

The effort is so worthwhile though. Even if you have a big yard where your dog will be able to get as much exercise as she wants, you will sometimes want to be able to walk her on the street. Vacations, visits to the vet’s office and other excursions all mean taking the dog into situations where a leash is very useful.

If your pet has never been collared, let him get used to it before attempting to attach a leash on it. It is important to get something that is the right size, with some flexibility so that it will still fit the dog as she grows.

At first you may need to watch the dog while she is wearing the collar. If it is uncomfortable she will try to get it off. Something might catch and she could put herself at harm.

You should let your dog play with the leash the first time you attach it to the collar. Lessons don’t have to start immediately. You can put on the leash inside the house and just let the dog drag it around. This enables your dog to get used to it and play with it. Again you will need to watch the puppy to check that the leash does not get caught up in anything.

You have to talk to your dog while you teach him anything. You can start the lesson by walking her on the leash inside the house or in the yard.

Your dog will pull on the leash if there’s something interesting to look at or smell. You should try to balance out the control over your dog and her freedom. The leash should not be used to pull your dog, nor should it be used by your dog to pull you.

How will you be in control then? The answer is to use your voice along with gentle movements or flicks of the leash to recall the dog to you. If you want her to go to a certain direction, say her name a number of times to get her attention.

Taking the same walk every day is often the best way to go. You do not have to do this forever, but just while the dog is becoming accustomed to the leash. Once she learns how it’s done, you’ll be met with less and less resistance. You’ll have an easier time walking your dog on a leash if you teach her to come to you whenever you call her.

Training your dog with a leash sounds pretty easy. All you have to do is put the leash on the dog, isn’t it? That’s what non pet owners think. There is more to walking a dog on a leash than just that.
The effort is so worthwhile though. Even if you have a big yard where your dog will be able to get as much exercise as she wants, you will sometimes want to be able to walk her on the street. Vacations, visits to the vet’s office and other excursions all mean taking the dog into situations where a leash is very useful.
If your pet has never been collared, let him get used to it before attempting to attach a leash on it. It is important to get something that is the right size, with some flexibility so that it will still fit the dog as she grows.
At first you may need to watch the dog while she is wearing the collar. If it is uncomfortable she will try to get it off. Something might catch and she could put herself at harm.
You should let your dog play with the leash the first time you attach it to the collar. Lessons don’t have to start immediately. You can put on the leash inside the house and just let the dog drag it around. This enables your dog to get used to it and play with it. Again you will need to watch the puppy to check that the leash does not get caught up in anything.
You have to talk to your dog while you teach him anything. You can start the lesson by walking her on the leash inside the house or in the yard.
Your dog will pull on the leash if there’s something interesting to look at or smell. You should try to balance out the control over your dog and her freedom. The leash should not be used to pull your dog, nor should it be used by your dog to pull you.
How will you be in control then? The answer is to use your voice along with gentle movements or flicks of the leash to recall the dog to you. If you want her to go to a certain direction, say her name a number of times to get her attention.
Taking the same walk every day is often the best way to go. You do not have to do this forever, but just while the dog is becoming accustomed to the leash. Once she learns how it’s done, you’ll be met with less and less resistance. You’ll have an easier time walking your dog on a leash if you teach her to come to you whenever you call her.

Dog Crate Training

Dog Crate training your dog may take some time and effort, but can be useful in a variety of situations. If you have a new dog or puppy, you can use a dog crate to limit his access to the house until he learns all the house rules – like what he can and can’t chew on and where he can and can’t eliminate. Dog crates are also a safe way of transporting your dog in the car, as well as a way of taking him places where he may not be able to run freely. If you properly train your dog to use a dog crate, he’ll think his dog crate is a safe place and will be happy to spend time in his dog crate when needed.

Dog Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog’s age, temperament and past experiences. It’s important to keep two things in mind while dog crate training. Dog crates should always be associated with something pleasant, and training should take place in a series of small steps – don’t go too fast.

Step One: Introduce your Dog to the Dog Crate

Put the dog crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the dog crate. Bring your dog over to the dog crate and talk to him in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the dog crate door is securely fastened opened so it won’t hit your dog and frighten him.

To encourage your dog to enter the dog crate, drop some small food treats near it and then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the dog crate. If he refuses to go all the way in at first, that’s okay – don’t force him to enter. Continue tossing treats into the dog crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the dog crate to get the food. If he isn’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the dog crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days.

Step Two: Feeding your Dog in the Dog Crate

After introducing your dog to the dog crate, begin feeding him his regular meals near the dog crate. This will create a pleasant association with the dog crate. If your dog is readily entering the dog crate when you begin Step 2, put the food dish all the way at the back of the dog crate. If your dog is still reluctant to enter the dog crate, put the dish only as far inside as he will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed him, place the dish a little further back in the dog crate.

Once your dog is standing comfortably in the dog crate to eat his meal, you can close the door while he’s eating. At first, open the door as soon as he finishes his meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until he’s staying in the dog crate for ten minutes or so after eating. If he begins to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving him in the dog crate for a shorter time period. If he does whine or cry in the dog crate, it’s imperative that you not let him out until he stops. Otherwise, he’ll learn that the way to get out of the dog crate is to whine, so he’ll keep doing it.

Step Three: Conditioning Your Dog For Longer Time Periods

After your dog is eating his regular meals in the dog crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine him there for short time periods while you’re home. Call him over to the dog crate and give him a treat. Give him a command to enter such as, “kennel up.” Encourage him by pointing to the inside of the dog crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the dog crate, praise him, give him the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the dog crate for five to ten minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time, then let him out of the dog crate. Repeat this process several times a day. With each repetition, gradually increase the length of time you leave him in the dog crate and the length of time you’re out of his sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the dog crate for about 30 minutes with you out of sight the majority of the time, you can begin leaving him crated when you’re gone for short time periods and/or letting him sleep there at night. This may take several days or several weeks.

Step Four: Crating Your Dog When Left Alone

After your dog is spending about 30 minutes in the dog crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving him crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put him in the dog crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave him with a few safe toys in the dog crate. You’ll want to vary at what point in your “getting ready to leave” routine you put your dog in the dog crate. Although he shouldn’t be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate him anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don’t make your departures emotional and prolonged, but matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give him a treat for entering the dog crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don’t reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to him in an excited, enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low key. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you’re home so he doesn’t associate crating with being left alone.

Step Five: Crating Your Dog At Night

Put your dog in the dog crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the dog crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night, and you’ll want to be able to hear your puppy when he whines to be let outside. Older dogs, too, should initially be kept nearby so that crating doesn’t become associated with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with his dog crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer.

Electric Dog Fence – Use Caution In Training

It is not difficult to condition a dog to an electric dog fence system if you understand your dog’s personality or temperament. By understanding your dog’s personality and not trying to prematurely rush to get your dog contained on an electric fence for dogs, you can be sure your dog will adapt safely and easily to the boundaries of his/her property.

If training isn’t done correctly, dogs can be afraid to even go outside. Poor training can cause dogs to use the home as a place to do its business. It can cause more fearful and timid tendencies to grow. Improperly trained dogs can repeatedly run through the invisible fence and sometimes can never be contained.

It takes no more time to properly train and condition a dog to the invisible fence for dogs than it does to do it wrong. I bet your dog would want to learn the right way if it could express itself. Done properly, a dog does not have to fear the underground dog containment system; but, can and will learn to enjoy the freedom of the yard.

What is the best way to train a dog to the invisible dog fence? Use a professional dog trainer. The little fee paid for his/her services will present a dog that adjusts easily to its boundaries. A properly trained dog will not test a boundary as much; thus, there will be less chance of him escaping the system. Also, a properly trained dog will not be afraid of the invisible fence for dogs; but respect it and its outer limits.

There are very few electric dog fence companies that require each dealership to have a professional dog trainer on staff; but, that would be a company high on my list.

Most invisible fence companies use their installer or hourly employee to help teach your dog. Would you let your neighbor or a person off of the street train your dog? I wouldn’t. And I would not allow someone not qualified to condition your dog to the system. Don’t assume your electric dog fence company has a true professional trainer for conditioning.. Ask them. Let them prove it to you by providing you with obedience testimonials and credentials.

In conclusion, the underground fence for dogs is a great tool for keeping dogs safe in their yards. Search for an electric dog fence company that has good quality products and employs real professional trainers. If a dog does escape the electric fence for dogs boundary, your invisible fence company’s professional trainer should provide a training regimen to fix it.