Greyhound Training

The following article is about do’s and don’ts in the field of greyhound care and greyhound dog training tips. But a good thing to keep in mind is that not all those adopting will need this article; in fact, some do not have experience the usual issues at all! On the contrary, some are simply blown away by the breed’s simplicity, laidback temper, and quiet disposition.

But in order to reach such a near-ideal stage, potential grey owners need to know the facts. Rehomed Greys live most of their young, active years in a crate eighteen hours a day. So it’s no metaphor that this breed needs to be assisted to feel familiar and secure in the home.

But is there any way to know if a dog is feeling particularly stressed? Just some of the signals that a dog will send to say it is not relaxed is a dripping nose, diarrhea, sweaty paws, whining, panting and restlessness. But owners must not get bogged down by these details; keep working on gaining the dog’s trust, and in three to five days the dog’s stable personality will show, and it will trust you. The following ideas are the essentials in greyhound training.

1. Keep the lines of communication open with the Greyhound

If owners want to get better in taking care of their dog, they will need to understand how racers think and respond.

For example, a few trips to the dog’s rescue group will reveal that Greys tend to be skittish and wary of very new things in their environment, and to makes matters more complicated, rehomed greys are pressured to learn new things while living with their adopters. What owners can do is to present new experiences from positive and enriching angles.

When other dogs get frustrated, they turn noisy and restless; not so the Grey. It will turn rigid, watching. At this point when the dog refuses to absorb anything, an owner does well in backing off and giving the dog breathing space.

Another “Greyhound” thing to know is that they startle easily and will steam full-speed away from the perceived threat. Be careful about properly securing your grey with a good-fitting greyhound collar and a strong leash.

2. Keep in mind that Greyhounds are students forever.

This means all of the dog’s waking hours, and all of the events in the dog’s day, are moments that it absorbs things and learns. Try to take advantage of all these moments to teach the dog something.

But what’s to be done with the Grey that keeps on doing something that’s a no-no? An observer of this will need to figure out how this negative actions is being unwittingly “approved” and “condoned,” especially if by you! Naturally, if an owner wants the dog to do good, he/she will need to check out how to reward that instead.

3. Owners must put up a winning relationship.

Training is of course, far beyond obedience and manners. At its core and heart, training is establishing a good relationship and keeping the “lines of communication” open.

Note that Greys learn a lot from a human’s actions and moods. If there’s a way to wear out the dog in the bad sense, it would be through harshness and through making the dog think you’re unhappy with it. A grey in statue mode is unhappy and is fed up with how things are.

And a last greyhound training note regarding canine sensitivity: especially malicious and unsavory events may leave a deep scar, so keep control over situations that may scare the dog. There are a number of dog training collars that will help you with properly training your Greyhound.