Jerky Treats Killing Dogs, Cats – 2013 Recall for Dog Food Treats

Jerky treats are killing dogs (and some cats) and after an earlier recall, the FDA is seeking more information on dog food treats that have been sold over the last few years that may have sickened pets.

Most of the jerky treats implicated have been made in China.

Pet owners are concerned now that new numbers have been released and it has been revealed that almost 600 pets have died from illnesses linked to the dog treats.

Some of the cases have have involved “kidney failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, and a rare kidney disorder. About 60 percent of cases involved gastrointestinal illness, and about 30 percent involved kidney and urinary systems.”

What should pet owners do?

The best thing to do is to only buy treats made in the USA.

If you ignore the warnings and still feed your dogs the treats and your pet becomes sick, the government agency warns to”stop the treats immediately, consider seeing your veterinarian, and save any remaining treats and the packaging for possible testing.

How To Deal with Dog Biting Problems

Dogs are often referred to as man’s best friend and rightfully so, since they do have a unique way of bringing joy and laughter into anybody’s home. Some dog breeds even look so cute that one can hardly resist cuddling and playing with them. But, when you have to deal with dog biting problems as you most probably would while raising a puppy, your dog can definitely seem a lot less cute and cuddly.

In order to successfully deal with dog biting problems, you will have to dig deep and get to the root of the problem. Find out exactly why your dog is biting so that you will know what particular situation you should address directly. The best way to get to the root cause of the problem is to observe your dog. Watch how he reacts to different individuals (including children) and situations as well as to other animals. Many dog owners who find themselves having to contend with dog biting problems often feel overwhelmed and end up getting rid of the dog. What you should do instead is get rid of the reason for the biting. It’s only logical that the dog will stop biting when he no longer has any reason to do so.

Patience and confidence are the key factors for successfully dealing with dog biting problems. Understandably, this problem can be very frustrating for a dog owner, especially since it may pose a danger to other people and even the owner himself. But, no matter how frustrating it is, the problem CAN be solved and that is what you need to keep in mind.

When your children get sick, you know that it is because of a virus. Therefore, you eliminate the virus in order to relieve the sickness. In the same way, dog biting problems are merely results arising from some other factor. By identifying and addressing that factor with patience and confidence, you can effectively eliminating the biting problems. Patience is especially needed when you are still trying to identify what the root cause is. It is also important for you to keep the communication lines between you and your dog open when you are dealing with dog biting problems. Make sure that you do not allow your dog to have his own way during this period. The very moment you see signs of your dog attempting to bite, immediately give a command to correct the action. Be sure to give a command which you know your dog will understand.

Do not expect your dog to immediately obey your command. In fact, it may be safe to say that you can expect your dog to DISOBEY you at this point. You should therefore be firm and consistent in giving the correction. Let the dog know that no matter what happens, you are standing your ground and biting is not allowed. Dealing with dog biting problems can truly be a stressful experience, but you will feel a lot better once you have overcome it and you might even develop a closer bond with your dog in the process.

How To Leash Train Your Dog

Training your dog with a leash sounds pretty easy. All you have to do is put the leash on the dog, isn’t it? That’s what non pet owners think. There is more to walking a dog on a leash than just that.

The effort is so worthwhile though. Even if you have a big yard where your dog will be able to get as much exercise as she wants, you will sometimes want to be able to walk her on the street. Vacations, visits to the vet’s office and other excursions all mean taking the dog into situations where a leash is very useful.

If your pet has never been collared, let him get used to it before attempting to attach a leash on it. It is important to get something that is the right size, with some flexibility so that it will still fit the dog as she grows.

At first you may need to watch the dog while she is wearing the collar. If it is uncomfortable she will try to get it off. Something might catch and she could put herself at harm.

You should let your dog play with the leash the first time you attach it to the collar. Lessons don’t have to start immediately. You can put on the leash inside the house and just let the dog drag it around. This enables your dog to get used to it and play with it. Again you will need to watch the puppy to check that the leash does not get caught up in anything.

You have to talk to your dog while you teach him anything. You can start the lesson by walking her on the leash inside the house or in the yard.

Your dog will pull on the leash if there’s something interesting to look at or smell. You should try to balance out the control over your dog and her freedom. The leash should not be used to pull your dog, nor should it be used by your dog to pull you.

How will you be in control then? The answer is to use your voice along with gentle movements or flicks of the leash to recall the dog to you. If you want her to go to a certain direction, say her name a number of times to get her attention.

Taking the same walk every day is often the best way to go. You do not have to do this forever, but just while the dog is becoming accustomed to the leash. Once she learns how it’s done, you’ll be met with less and less resistance. You’ll have an easier time walking your dog on a leash if you teach her to come to you whenever you call her.

Training your dog with a leash sounds pretty easy. All you have to do is put the leash on the dog, isn’t it? That’s what non pet owners think. There is more to walking a dog on a leash than just that.
The effort is so worthwhile though. Even if you have a big yard where your dog will be able to get as much exercise as she wants, you will sometimes want to be able to walk her on the street. Vacations, visits to the vet’s office and other excursions all mean taking the dog into situations where a leash is very useful.
If your pet has never been collared, let him get used to it before attempting to attach a leash on it. It is important to get something that is the right size, with some flexibility so that it will still fit the dog as she grows.
At first you may need to watch the dog while she is wearing the collar. If it is uncomfortable she will try to get it off. Something might catch and she could put herself at harm.
You should let your dog play with the leash the first time you attach it to the collar. Lessons don’t have to start immediately. You can put on the leash inside the house and just let the dog drag it around. This enables your dog to get used to it and play with it. Again you will need to watch the puppy to check that the leash does not get caught up in anything.
You have to talk to your dog while you teach him anything. You can start the lesson by walking her on the leash inside the house or in the yard.
Your dog will pull on the leash if there’s something interesting to look at or smell. You should try to balance out the control over your dog and her freedom. The leash should not be used to pull your dog, nor should it be used by your dog to pull you.
How will you be in control then? The answer is to use your voice along with gentle movements or flicks of the leash to recall the dog to you. If you want her to go to a certain direction, say her name a number of times to get her attention.
Taking the same walk every day is often the best way to go. You do not have to do this forever, but just while the dog is becoming accustomed to the leash. Once she learns how it’s done, you’ll be met with less and less resistance. You’ll have an easier time walking your dog on a leash if you teach her to come to you whenever you call her.

Harness or Collar – What’s Best?

Used imprpperly collars can do damage to your dog’s neck (including the trachea, esophagus, and more) over the years. An easy way to prevent the damage is to attach your dog’s leash to a harness instead of a collar.

If your dog pulls a lot on his leash, you can buy a training tool such as an Easy Walk Harness or a Gentle Leadeer Head Collar and use that tool on walks while you teach your dog to walk more nicely. (Be sure to follow the instructions when using training tools like these.) Once your dog understands how to walk politely on leash, you can remove the training tool and simply walk your dog in a regular body harness.

You Must Do This When Dog Training

Is there a secret to dog training? No, not really. But there is one foundation skill that can make everything else come much easier: getting eye contact from your dog in a variety of settings. Practice getting sustained (at least a few seconds) eye contact from your dog in different places, either in response to her name or to a cue like “Watch me!”