Airedale Terrier

The Airedale Terrier was named for the valley of the Aire in England, the place where the breed most likely originated. The Airedale was developed from similar terriers that are now extinct. Before the breed evolved into today’s Airedale, it was called the Waterside or Bingley Terrier.

Airedales were originally bred to be versatile working dogs. They were skilled hunters, reliable messengers, and dutiful guard dogs. In fact, they have been used all over the world for their abilities. Airedale Terriers were first registered with the AKC in 1888.

Size: 40-65 pounds
Colors: Black and Tan & Grizzle and Tan

Health Problems:

Responsible breeders strive to maintain the highest breed standards as established by kennel clubs like the AKC. Dogs bred by these standards are less likely to inherit health conditions. However, some hereditary health problems can occur in the breed. The following are some conditions to be aware of:

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus

About the Breed:

The Airedale Terrier is the largest of the terriers – often called the “King of Terriers.” This breed is highly energetic and brave with a square, sturdy build and deep chest.

Airedales are smart and protective dogs that must be trained properly. An unsocialized, unruly Airedale can be quite difficult to live with. However, with patience and consistency, the Airedale can become a very obedient, trustworthy companion. Though Airedales can be excellent family dogs, most do best with older children (and after proper training).

Airedales have unique hair coats, including a wiry top coat with a softer undercoat. The breed is known to be a low-shedder. Because of their coarse, curly hair, much attention must be placed on proper grooming, including regular haircuts and brushing.

The high energy level of the Airedale makes serious exercise a requirement. The more activity, the better for this breed. Airedales benefit from plenty of physical and mental stimulation. This, along with a healthy diet and routine veterinary care will help keep your Airedale healthy for many years.

Is A Boxer Right For You?

If you are interested in having a boxer as a pet, and this is the first time that you are going to have a pet, then it would be wise to follow a methodical way to this . This means that the first and the foremost thing that you should do is find out everything about boxers. And one thing that you will come across is that Boxers come in different colors. For example you have fawn colored, red, white and also brindle Boxers.

There is no color favorite among Boxer owners, although brindle colored Boxers have their own appeal. It is also common to find white markings on Boxers of all varieties.

If you have ever been an owner of a boxer, then you know how playful and feisty Boxers can be. You would also be aware of the fact that they make good pets and there is no need to be scared of their ferocious behavior.

As mentioned earlier, Boxers are available in all shades from red to white to fawn, and among these brindle dogs are the most popular. But all this has no link with a dog’s temperament and if you think that the temperament of a Boxer would depend on its color then you are totally mistaken.

Boxer’s are also a friendly sort of dog and if trained at early age to interact with other pets and animals, will be able to live in comparative harmony with them. A Boxer also makes a great family dog for a number of reasons, the main one being because they are playful and affectionate, as well as being loyal.

Another important characteristic of boxers is that they are highly intelligent and can be easily trained. They have a fast learning cycle that is why they can be easily trained, although they may get into trouble sometimes. Boxers can also be used a competition dogs, not only as show dogs but also in the obedience category.

One thing that needs to understood is that although brindle, fawn and red Boxers can be registered freely in Kennel Clubs, some clubs do not accept white Boxers.

So if you want to list your dog in a Kennel Club, it is better that you get a fawn, red or brindle Boxer instead of a white one. Another thing you might be interested to know is that Boxers are named so because they sometimes tend to life their front paws in a manner that is similar to how human boxers lift their hands in the ring.

Top Ten Dog Breeds of 2009

Every year, the AKC releases the list of the most registered dog breeds. More or less, that list ranks the breeds in order of popularity. With the order of the top ten “usual suspects” slightly shifted, 2009 brought no surprises. Check out this list of the top ten dogs breeds of 2009 according to the AKC dog breed registration statistics and see if your favorite breed made the top ten. Is your breed not on the top ten?

1. Labrador Retriever

There’s no surprise here. The Labrador Retriever has held the number one spot for 19 consecutive years, and for good reason. This energetic, fun-loving retriever has “family dog” written all over it. Loyal and affectionate, the Lab wins over the hearts of just about everyone it meets. For over 200 years, the Lab has been treasured for its loyalty, intelligence and athleticism. The breed is often seen working as a service animal or gun dog, but remains a favorite among those looking for an all-around canine companion.

View the full list to see where your dog placed.