Doing The Impossible: Cleaning Cat Urine

Most of us would probably agree that there are thousands of things we would rather be spending our time doing than cleaning cat urine. Don’t forget that cleaning the stuff up will be much more pleasant than smelling it for years to come: Ask any cat owner that has had a cat relieve themselves on a carpet, article of furniture, hardwood flooring, etc. Once the smell seeps in, it can really seem impossible at times to get rid of it.

Tried & True Method

First and foremost for when you start cleaning cat urine: Soak up as much of it as you can with paper towels, wet/dry vacuum, etc. Don’t let it soak in to the area any longer than is possible.

Next, generously sprinkle baking soda all over the affected area, then spray or pour some diluted vinegar on it (pure vinegar can be used, but not diluting it may discolor fabrics).

Use an old scrub brush or rag and thoroughly wipe the area.

Now sprinkle some more baking soda on and follow up with some hydrogen peroxide and a few drops of dish soap (or laundry detergent).

Scrub again and don’t forget the “elbow grease.” Follow up with a vacuuming.

Any areas that don’t have fabric can be bleached. Bleach is actually the most effective home remedy for cleaning cat urine, but it will destroy clothes and carpets.

If all else fails, or you don’t want to spend time using the method above: Look for commercial products with enzymes in them specifically designed to break down the smell of cat urine. Don’t feel like you’re alone in thinking that cat urine is one of the most offensive and hard to destroy smells that will grip your home: It is and can be quite embarrassing having a friend or neighbor point out the smell while you’re having dinner or drinks.

Find out more on cleaning cat urine.

4 Cat Illness Symptoms You Shouldn’t Ignore

It’s important that you as an owner, are aware of most of the cat illness symptoms that can indicate your furry friend is in need of some help. Most cats will display a number of symptoms when they become ill and a little watchful observation by you will go a long way to maintaining their health. Some feline sicknesses can be dealt with at home, while others may require you to get to your veterinarian for a closer examination.

See below for 4 symptoms you should be aware of:

Depression: This is a tough problem to tackle, as our ability to communicate is at a significant disadvantage. Feline depression may be brought on by an untreated physical illness, or can be caused by loneliness, change in surroundings (I.e., moving to a new house, new owners), bullying by other pets, or mental illnesses that can be hard to diagnose.

Discharges from the eyes and ears: A discharge similar to mucous is normal from the eyes in small amounts, but if you see a lot of discharge from the eyes and/or the ears, it could be a sign of infection.

Frequent/Infrequent trips to the litter box: A healthy cat will urinate once every 2 – 3 hours and should move their bowels 2 or 3 times per day. If they are at the litter box every hour, or urinating all over the house, these are cat illness symptoms that cannot be ignored as they could be developing feline diabetes (especially if your cat seems to drink a lot of water) or have a urinary tract infection. Constipation can be serious, or they may need a higher quality food with more fiber content.

Hair-loss: This is one of the less common cat illness symptoms, but is usually caused by malnutrition or a variety of skin conditions such as dermatitis, fleas and bathing with the wrong shampoo (cats have oils on their skin that are essential to the health of their coat). Hair-loss and skin issues are cat illness symptoms that normally require intervention, so be on the lookout.