Atta Boy! Be Your Dog’s Personal Cheerleader

The very moment that a dog starts to respond to “come,” you want to verbally celebrate his response – and to use verbal encouragement all the way back to you from wherever he was and whatever he was doing.

Then when he reaches you, make a big fuss over him. If you don’t make the payoff pleasurable for the dog, then why would he give up independence and another activity to return to you?

This article is courtesy of RadioFence.com a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars.

What’s the Rush? Clip One Nail at a Time

If your dog gets nervous when getting her toenails cut, then do one nail at a time. Keep the snip just on the tip and give a very good treat afterward. If the dog really gets nervous, don’t do the next nail immediately – spread it out over a few days with tasty treats for each nail cut.

This article is courtesy of RadioFence.com a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars.

Pug

There is much debate over the true origins of the Pug, but it is generally believed that the breed came from China. The Pug may be related to the Pekingese, though some believe the breed came from the Bulldog or Mastiff. The Pug was once the companion of Buddhist monks in Tibet.Over time, Pugs became popular among European royalty. Napoleon’s wife, Josephine had a Pug that carried secret messages to Napoleon in prison. Pugs and Pekingese were brought back to England after the British overran the Chinese Imperial Palace in 1860.

The Pug was first registered with the AKC in 1885 and has continued to gain popularity.

Size:

13-20 pounds

Color:

Fawn or Black

Health Problems:

Responsible breeders strive to maintain the highest breed standards as established by kennel clubs like the AKC. Dogs bred by these standards are less likely to inherit health conditions. However, some hereditary health problems can occur in the breed. The following are some conditions to be aware of:

  • Brachycephalic Syndrome
  • Entropion
  • Corneal Ulcers
  • Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis (GME), also known as Pug Dog Encephalitis (PDE)

About the Breed:

The Pug is a jovial dog with a round and wrinkly head, a short nose, a stout and sturdy little body and a curly tail. This adorable little dog is good-natured, energetic and playful, making it a suitable companion for all kinds of families.

The Pug has a short, soft hair coat with a tendency to shed. Basic routine grooming is generally sufficient for the breed. Extra attention should be placed upon keeping the facial folds clean to prevent infections.

As with any dog breed, the Pug should be thoroughly trained. This breed does have a great deal of energy, so proper training and routine exercise are recommended.

The Pug is a little dog with a big personality, so it is ideal for those who want a compact but active companion dog. The even-tempered demeanor of this breed makes it a good choice for families with children.

This article is courtesy of RadioFence.com a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars, Pet Supplies

Nursing a Sick Dog

Occasionally, dogs require extra attention when they are sick. If they have acquired an illness, an injury or have been through surgery, nursing will help his recovery. There are certain methods to effectively nursing a sick dog. It is a vital service you can provide to your sick pet.

A sick dog will often have a high fever that needs attention. Feed your dog bread pieces while avoiding heavy meat products. Stick to vegetarian meals during the initial stages of recovery.

Chicken soup broth or beef broth is a good meat substitute until the fever breaks. As the dog regains strength, begin adding more solid and nutritious foods. Do not give a sick dog human food or junk food as these put more stress on his system.

The type of food and frequency you feed your dog will depend on what made him sick. If he had surgery or had some sort of blockage, be sure to check with your veterinarian as to proper feeding. If the digestive tract was involved, a special diet might be required.

Keep your dog comfortable in a calm area that is warm and away from drafts. Provide soft bedding. If arthritis is present, this will help tremendously. You can also purchase specially-designed bedding for dogs with arthritis.

After administering any medications, keep the dog quiet so they can have the maximum effect. Take time to sit with the dog and show some affection to help ease the stress his body and mind are enduring.

Do not raise the dog’s head too much when administering the drugs as this can cause the medications to go into his respiratory organs, putting your dog at further risk of developing pneumonia.

Be sure to feed your dog warm fluids regularly during the recovery process. These will keep him hydrated and help fight infections. It will also help his body to better utilize any drugs that are prescribed.

If the dog has severe diarrhea, dehydration can occur. This can be combated by giving him a mixture of salt and glucose water. You can give your dog ice cubes or egg whites to help ease the oesophageal passage when vomiting is present.

Monitor the dog’s body temperature. There are several thermometers available that you can use. Ask your veterinarian for one that he would recommend for your dog’s particular condition.

Keep the dog in an area where the temperature can be regulated safely. Do not put your sick dog in front of a fan or an air conditioner as this will trigger further illness and possibly pneumonia. Put him in a well ventilated space where he feels comfortable and safe.

If the dog is suffering from hypothermia, provide him with warm blankets.

Give your dog all the attention you can spare. Knowing that you have not abandoned him will help him to get through the fear and stress of being sick. Do not try to play as he will not be strong enough or interested. Simply stroke him and show him you care. By providing physical contact, you will speed up his healing process.

This article is courtesy of RadioFence.com a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars.

Springtime Safety Tips

Springtime is just around the corner, but the gentle season could prove to be not so kind to curious pets and unknowing pet owners.

A host of risks present themselves to dogs, cats and other companion animals, and pet parents should be able to identify these potential harms in order to keep the spring days bright, sunny, and fun for all.

The list of toxic, common household items might surprise even the most veteran, conscientious owners.

Lilies, sago palm, azalea, rhododendron, tulips, daffodils and chrysanthemums are all toxic for pets. If a cat, in particular, ingests just bit of a lily, it could lead to kidney failure. Keeping indoor plants and flowers at hard-to-reach distances could be one solution, but just to be safe, owners may want to abstain from planting these and a few other flora all together.

The ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) received approximately 7,858 calls in 2009 reporting ingestion of one of the aforementioned plants and flowers. That number was out of the 195,000 calls the APCC received in total last year.

The APCC released these figures, and the most common culprits for pet poisonings, in anticipation of National Poison Prevention Week, which runs from March 14 to 20. Perhaps it’s not coincidental that the week coincides with the seasonal shift, as well as with the lead-up preparations for celebrating St. Patrick’s Day and Easter.

As owners venture outside more to beautify their gardens and treat their hard, dried land, they should also remain aware of the harm that certain types of fertilizer and garden products can inflict on their outdoor pets. Last year, the ASPCA responded to 2,329 calls related to fertilizer exposure, which can cause gastrointestinal obstruction and “severe gastric upset.”

Consuming flower bulbs, in particular, could result in a painful, unpleasant experience for both pets and their concerned owners.

Aside from the consumption of seemingly innocent, but truly dangerous, typical household and garden items, pets might also fall victim to one of spring’s more common, yet ultimately benign ailments: allergies.

Yes, pets can feel the effects of allergies,  but will exhibit symptoms slightly differently from how humans do.

When animals inhale certain pollen they tend to get itchy skin, lick at their feet, chew at the base of their tail and get a rash. We don’t know exactly what the culprit is, but we recommend certain types of testing and treatment for animals with severe allergies.

Flea and tick treatments like Frontline and Revolution could help prevent skin discomfort, as well as protect pets from unwanted bug bites and infestations.

Yet pet owners should use only dog products for dogs, and cat products for cats – this tip might sound obvious, but as owners sometimes throw the tubes into a drawer without the box, and then don’t read the instructions carefully, it’s important to keep in mind.

This article is courtesy of RadioFence.com a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars.