Rottweilers

The Rottweiler, or “Rottie,” is a large, muscular and rugged dog with a hard-working and confident demeanor. The breed is intelligent and very loyal to its family. The Rottie can be an excellent working dog, watchdog or guard dog. Though it has a bit of a reputation as a “dangerous breed,” this is an unfair generalization – most Rotties are calm and affectionate.

The Rottie has a short, somewhat coarse, but shiny hair coat. This breed has a moderate shedding rate, and and requires little more than basic grooming care.

The Rottie has a drive to work, high endurance, a commanding presence and a potential for territorial behavior. Ideally, a Rottie should get vigorous exercise on a daily basis. Many Rotties will benefit from some type of “job,” such as guarding the home, obedience competition, or tracking. Few Rotties have an aggressive nature, despite what some people think. They are usually very calm, loyal and loving companions. However, all Rotties should be put on a strict training program to best utilize their intelligence and energy, thus keeping them happy, healthy and safe.

Though the exact origins of the Rottweiler are not known, it is believed that the breed derived from the Mastiff and that its ancestors can be traced back to ancient Rome. Later development of the breed occurred in the German town of Rottweil, where it worked as a cattle dog and sometimes a police dog before its popularity diminished. At one time, the breed was referred to as the Rottweil Metzgerhund (butcher dog).In the early 20th century, the breed was once again used as a police dog and began gaining popularity in the U.S. The hard-working nature of the Rottweiler has made its popularity grow over the years.

Size:

Males: 95-130 pounds
Females: 80-115 pounds

Colors:

Black with Tan, Rust or Mahogany

Health Problems:

Responsible breeders strive to maintain the highest breed standards as established by kennel clubs like the AKC. Dogs bred by these standards are less likely to inherit health conditions. However, some hereditary health problems can occur in the breed. The following are some conditions to be aware of:

Courtesy of RadioFence.com, a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including Pet Doors, Dog Training Shock Collars and Bark Collars

PetSafe Aquires Premier Pet Products

Radio Systems Corporation, owner of PetSafe, Innotek, and SportDOG branded products has acquired Premier Pet Products.

The Radio Systems team is extremely excited to add Premier to the family of brands. Premier and Radio Systems Corporation have taken different approaches to the market in terms of training philosophy and new product development. We are certain that the expertise we bring together from divergent camps will result in strong new product development and creation of new product categories for you to offer your customer base and strengthen the Human/Animal relationship.

Courtesy of RadioFence.com, a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars.

PetSafe Purchase Vet Ventures

Radio Systems Corporation, owner of PetSafe, Innotek, SportDOG, and Premier branded products has acquired the assets of Vet Ventures and the rights to manufacture and sell the Drinkwell Pet Fountain product line.

I see this as a great acquisition for Radio Systems and our customers. We recently introduced a collection of Healthy Pet Station feeders and water systems, so this is a great complement to that line. The Drinkwell® Pet Fountain is already a great product, and I’m confident that we can take it to a new level to provide pet owners with even more choices in water systems for their beloved pets.

Vet Venture Inc.’s Drinkwell® brand name will remain in the short term due to its strong market recognition. We will keep the Drinkwell product name however in the near future they will transition to the PetSafe® brand.

Courtesy of RadioFence.com, a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars.

Summer Vacations With Your Pet

If you are planning a trip, have you considered whether or not your dog gets to come along? Do you know how to travel with your dog? Traveling with your dog can be loads of fun if you make all the right arrangements. However, poor planning can really ruin the vacation for everyone. If you think it would be best for your dog to stay behind, then look for a pet sitter or find a kennel where you can board your dog. If you have decided that your furry companion should be part of your trip, let the planning begin.

Start by keeping a collar with current identification on your dog at all times. A microchip or dog tracking collar may also be beneficial for extra security. Before you travel, your dog should have basic training so he will be well-behaved during the trip. Then, plan the transportation, accommodations and daily activities. Learning how to travel with your dog can make the experience less stressful and a lot of fun!

Travel By Air

Air travel for dogs is not always a great idea. Though canines are not cargo to us pet parents, they are usually considered such by the airlines. The cargo hold does not make for a pleasant travel experience, even for relaxed dogs. This is not to say that flying is not an option, just that it is not ideal. Small dog owners are in luck, though. Some airlines will allow you to bring your pet in a pet carrier if it can fit under the seat in front of you. Learn the finer details of air travel with dogs so you can be fully informed before you book a flight.

Pet-loving entrepreneurs have been developing pet-friendly airlines that may actually be affordable. One such company is Pet Airways, a pet-only (no human passengers) airline that allows pets to fly in the main cabin rather than cargo. However, these flights are only available in a limited number of cities. Until these types of airlines are more accessible, many of us will have to make do with the rules or scrape up the dough to charter a plane.

By Automobile

The automobile is usually the best way to travel with dogs. If you own a vehicle, chances are your dog has ridden in it for trips to the vets, the park and so on. If not, now is the time to start. Some dogs have anxiety over riding in cars. The more positive your dog’s automobile experiences are, the more likely he will enjoy the rides. If your dog only rides in the car for vet visits, and he dislikes the vet, his anxiety is understandable. Try taking him for short, frequent car rides that end up at the park, dog supply store (where he will get a toy or treat), or another pleasant place. If your dog does not adjust to the car, then a road trip is not a good option. If you must bring your dog for a long car ride, ask your vet about possible anti-anxiety medications that can make the trip a bit easier on everyone. Otherwise, you should seek out other options. Remember, medications should be used sparingly.

If you’ve decided that Rover can handle the trip, make sure you make all the proper arrangements.

Plan Ahead

Plot rest stops along the way while traveling with your dog, and plan to stop every 3-5 hours to allow your dog to relieve himself, drink water and stretch his legs (more or less depending on your dog’s needs). Make a list of several veterinary hospitals that are easily accessible from your route, preferably within one hour’s drive from any given point. Check that they will be open during your travel.

Bring for the car ride:

  • Lists of rest stops and veterinary hospitals
  • Leash
  • Dog seat belt or crate / kennel
  • Water and Bowls
  • Treats
  • One or two toys
  • Blanket and/or dog bed
  • Bags to pick up waste
  • Medications, if applicable
  • Your dog’s medical records

Hotels and Dogs

If you will be staying at a hotel while traveling with your dog, cover all your bases in advance. A pet-friendly hotel is more than just one that allows pets – it is one that welcomes them. Some hotels offer special dog beds, turndown service (down to the treat on the pillow), dog spa services and doggie day care. Ask what amenities are available for your dog, but remember to find out what cost is involved. Many hotels charge a non-refundable pet deposit upon arrival, then a daily pet fee. Some even tack on a special cleaning fee. Bottom line, before you choose, do your research about pet-friendly hotels.

Bed and Breakfast / Inns for Dogs

Inns and B&Bs are typically not equipped for dogs. However, they do exist. It is essential that you know how to prepare for the trip prior to finalizing your plans. Learn about bringing your dog to a B&B, then look for a dog-friendly location.

Camping with Dogs

Camping with your dog can be the perfect way to spend time together while communing with nature. However, camping with dogs is not always a wise choice. Before you decide to bring your dog, make sure the campground you are considering actually allows dogs. Many state and national parks do not allow dogs. Above all, learn how to have fun and stay safe while camping.

BE PREPARED

Emergencies do not only happen close to home, they can also happen while traveling with your dog. Advance planning can make these emergencies less stressful. Before the trip, make a list of veterinary hospitals in the area where you will be staying, along with a map. If your dog shows sudden signs of illness, that list can help save your dog’s life. Before you leave for your trip, make sure you have not forgotten anything. Use this list as a guide while you are packing. Add your own personal touch as needed.

  1. Lists of rest stops and veterinary hospitals along your trip (if driving)
  2. List of veterinary hospitals near the location where you are staying
  3. Crate / kennel
  4. Leash
  5. Water and Bowls
  6. Dog Food
  7. Treats
  8. One or two toys
  9. Blankets and/or dog bed
  10. Bags to pick up waste
  11. First Aid Kit
  12. Grooming supplies, if necessary
  13. Medications, if applicable
  14. Your dog’s medical records (including vaccine history)
  15. Health Certificate (obtain from your vet)

Now you’re all set – be safe and enjoy your trip!

Clicker Dog Training

One of the easiest ways to train your dog is to capture the behaviors you like. Capturing behaviors means waiting for your dog to perform a certain behavior, and rewarding it so he will repeat it again. It won’t work for everything you want to teach your dog, but you may be surprised at how quickly your dog learns to do new things when you use this clicker training technique.

What You Need

To capture your dog’s behavior, all you need is a handful of small treats and a clicker. It’s also important that your dog understands the meaning of the clicker (i.e. a click = a treat). The more clicker savvy the dog, the better this technique works, and the more behaviors you can teach this way.

The Rules for Using a Clicker to Capture Behaviors

The best thing about capturing behaviors is that you can do it anytime and anywhere, as long as you have your clicker and some treats on hand. You can even do it during commercial breaks while you watch television. The only rule to remember is that you should only work on capturing one behavior at a time.

How to Capture Your Dog’s Behavior

First, you need to decide which behavior you want to capture. It can be any behavior you would like your dog to perform – lying down, sitting, rolling over, etc. Then all you have to do is wait. As soon as you see your dog perform the behavior you want, click the clicker and give him a treat.

If your dog is new to clicker training, or if you have not attempted to capture behaviors before, it will probably take him a little while to understand what you want him to do. Start with a simple behavior like “sit” or “down.” You can work on more difficult behaviors once he is used to this training technique. Once most dogs get the hang of this type of clicker training, it becomes a fun game for them.

If your dog is already an expert at clicker training, chances are he will catch on quickly. Once he hears the first click and gets his treat, he will start offering behaviors in an attempt to figure out what you want him to do. Soon after he figures it out, he will begin repeating the behavior you want fairly quickly.

Add the Command

Once your dog has figured out the behavior you want him to perform, and is consistently repeating it, it’s time to add the command. Give the command for the behavior, and wait for your dog to do it. For instance, if you’re trying to capture your dog sitting, tell him “sit,” and as soon as he sits, click and give a treat. You will know your dog understands the command when you see the time decrease between when you give the command and when he performs the behavior. As easy as that, you will have taught your dog a new behavior!