House-training Puppies In The Winter–Educating Your Puppy In Cold Weather

Is housebreaking puppies in the winter significantly more difficult than at any other time of the year? Should the onset of winter make you think twice about bringing home a new puppy? In my opinion, the answer is a solid “no!” The essentials of housebreaking a new puppy remain the same. Our (my wife and I) dogs have been received housebreaking training during the winter and did just fine. In fact, they love the winter, but you, as owner, must take certain precautions due to the nature of the season.

There really is no need for concern where the winter weather is concerned. As mentioned above, the way housebreaking works does not really change. However, it is important to pay attention to the cold climate and understand that you may need to take extra care to be sure that your puppy is not at risk.

First, never turn your puppy outside by itself. That is particularly true for a very young puppy, but regardless, never leave your puppy unaccompanied. Stay outside with your pet until it ready to come inside.

The second main point to keep in mind is that puppies are much more vulnerable to cold weather than adult dogs. Because of this, the timing of when you take your puppy outside is important, and so you want to observe your dog carefully and notice when it looks as if it may need to go outside. This is important as puppies are especially sensitive to frostbite and hypothermia.

Hypothermia is a condition of too little warmth (hypo=not enough or under and thermia=heat). The puppy’s body temperature falls too low to keep it warm. If you see your puppy start to shiver, take it inside immediately and warm it up. A rule of thumb to follow is that if you are cold so is your puppy. Take it inside.

Frostbite is tissue damage to the skin due to cold. You will notice damaged skin turn pale or white. The most vulnerable areas will be the webbing between toes, the ears, and possibly the tail area.

When housebreaking your puppy, follow these basic guidelines, and you won’t go wrong:

(1)Start puppy housebreaking around 8 weeks old. (2)Establish a regular schedule. (3)Take your puppy outside when it looks like it wants to go. (4)Take the puppy outside approximately every two hours. (5)Be sure to take your puppy out not long after you have fed it. (6)Always stay outside with your puppy. (7)When weather is extreme, do not linger outside.

If you do nothing else but follow the pointers above, you and your puppy will survive a cold winter without problem. Even better, once the weather improves, your dog will continue to use its new skills as a housebroken pet.

Discover the key to puppy training techniques right now! More free info on housebreaking your puppy!

Getting A Shih Tzu

Not everyone is interested in having a Labrador, Beagle or a Puggle as a pet. In fact some people are much more interested in having Chihuahuas, Terriers, Poodles and adorable Shih Tzu’s. The breed mentioned at the last is one that is suited to almost all the people, and it cannot be denied that it has a lot of value among future dog owners.

Of course not everyone looking for a puppy starts off with a Shih Tzu puppy in mind, but when fate crosses this adorable puppy across their paths, it seems to be more than they can do to resist the inquisitive faces, the short upturned nose with the hair fanning out in all directions and the gentle adoring eyes staring at them with patent mischief.

Living an apartment life is something a Shih Tzu puppy can handle very easily; this is because they love being indoors and can be active in small indoor spaces too. A Shih Tzu puppy is also very indolent and more often than not you would find your Shih Tzu puppy lying in various comfortable positions around your home.

This is the reason why you should never over feed your Shih Tzu puppy, as it can very easily become fat and lazy. The best thing is to keep your puppy well fed and fully exercised. If you live in an apartment then it is necessary that you take your puppy out for regular walks. However try not to overtire your puppy by going for long distance walks, as Shih Tzu is a small breed of dog and doesn’t require a lot of exercise. If you are unable to take you Shih Tzu outside for a walk, consider getting a dog treadmill.

You may think about letting your Shih Tzu puppy play and run around in your yard, if you do have a yard. A daily walk is a good option, but in this case your Shih Tzu puppy is having all the exercise it needs throughout the day in small bouts. If you want to let your Shih Tzu out in the yard, an invisible fence is a good way to make sure he stays safe at home.

Shih Tzu’s can also make great watchdogs as they are alert and will tend to bark if aroused by something out of the ordinary. Luckily they don’t normally bark out of turn which is one of the reasons why getting a Shih Tzu puppy is ideal if you live in an apartment. If you find the barking to be excessive, a bark collar is a good way to keep the peace with your neighbors.

You might want to know that although Shih Tzu’s are quite friendly with children, especially older children, but they can be quite aggressive in certain circumstances (like when its tail is pulled) and might not be a suitable dog to have around young or very young or mischievous kids.

A Shih Tzu puppy is also an ideal option for the dog lover who is allergic to dogs, or rather dog hair. Shih Tzu’s shed almost none to very little fur which makes them a great candidate for allergy sufferers.

You might be surprised to know but Shih Tzus’ make very good show dogs. A little bit of grooming can make your very own Shih Tzu a champion show dog.

Is A Boxer Right For You?

If you are interested in having a boxer as a pet, and this is the first time that you are going to have a pet, then it would be wise to follow a methodical way to this . This means that the first and the foremost thing that you should do is find out everything about boxers. And one thing that you will come across is that Boxers come in different colors. For example you have fawn colored, red, white and also brindle Boxers.

There is no color favorite among Boxer owners, although brindle colored Boxers have their own appeal. It is also common to find white markings on Boxers of all varieties.

If you have ever been an owner of a boxer, then you know how playful and feisty Boxers can be. You would also be aware of the fact that they make good pets and there is no need to be scared of their ferocious behavior.

As mentioned earlier, Boxers are available in all shades from red to white to fawn, and among these brindle dogs are the most popular. But all this has no link with a dog’s temperament and if you think that the temperament of a Boxer would depend on its color then you are totally mistaken.

Boxer’s are also a friendly sort of dog and if trained at early age to interact with other pets and animals, will be able to live in comparative harmony with them. A Boxer also makes a great family dog for a number of reasons, the main one being because they are playful and affectionate, as well as being loyal.

Another important characteristic of boxers is that they are highly intelligent and can be easily trained. They have a fast learning cycle that is why they can be easily trained, although they may get into trouble sometimes. Boxers can also be used a competition dogs, not only as show dogs but also in the obedience category.

One thing that needs to understood is that although brindle, fawn and red Boxers can be registered freely in Kennel Clubs, some clubs do not accept white Boxers.

So if you want to list your dog in a Kennel Club, it is better that you get a fawn, red or brindle Boxer instead of a white one. Another thing you might be interested to know is that Boxers are named so because they sometimes tend to life their front paws in a manner that is similar to how human boxers lift their hands in the ring.

A Book To Assist You Choose Your Pet

Are you thinking about getting a pet but are unsure of which type to get? Finally, there are helpful tips for help you decide. Eric Nolah’s “Choosing a Dog Breed Guide” is a gem among pet books. It’s an convenient to carry and read paperback get ready to enjoy in various settings to assist you decide the right dog for you.

Many people make the mistake of choosing a pet without considering its breed or proclivities. They later discover the breed of dog was a bad match for their living situation. With Nolah’s text you can look at the different characteristics of many kinds of pets and decide which one seems most suitable for you.

The guide gives descriptions of many characteristics, most of which you might not know even though they pertain to very popular breeds. When you are making your selection on which pet to bring home, think about these traits and imagine how they would fit with your life.

Your living situation is incredibly important to consider when selecting a dog. If you have a backyard you plan to keep your pet in, you may want to stay away from breeds with a propensity to dig. If you have other pets like cats, it’s probably best to avoid breeds with aggressive streaks. Supposing you live in an apartment, you don’t necessarily want a form of dog that functions best with much space outdoors.

For detailed characterizations of many different breeds, this guide is an excellent resource. You can learn about breeds like the Alaskan malamute, Tibetan terrier, Welsh corgi, Japanese spitz and Afghan hound. More popular breeds covered include border collies, German shepherds, golden retrievers, poodles and beagles.

Factoring in pet breed characteristics when you make your choice can help you and the dog to achieve the best living situation possible. “Choosing a Pet Breed Guide” is among the best books of its kind and should prove very beneficial for conscientious pet owners.

Driving With Your Dog

For some dogs, a car ride is one of life’s happy experiences–almost as good as a roll in dead squirrel. For others, it’s a nerve-wracking experience that leaves them shivering and tense. What makes the difference?

Let’s put it this way: If the destination is always the vet’s office, he’s probably not going to enjoy whatever gets him there. But if the car also takes him to parks, beaches, and on shopping expeditions, well, then, cars rock.

Here are some other suggestions for making a drive fun–and safe–for your dog.

What to pack

Tips for a pleasant trip

The most important pointer is to make driving in a car a pleasant experience, from the moment you start spending time together. Many vets recommend you drive your new pet home, rather than pack him in a crate and fly him there, because it’s far less stressful on your dog.

If you’re just bringing him home for the first time, ask a friend or family member to come along so he or she can sit next to your puppy or dog, cuddle him, and offer reassurance that he’ll survive this first trip.

Within the first days of being home, take him somewhere fun in the car–to a park, or a beach–so he starts associating it immediately with good things. Make sure you make each trip pleasant–don’t play the music too loudly, talk to him if he seems nervous, make sure he’s comfortablely settled.

Other tips for a smooth ride:

Treat car sickness. If simple motion sickness is the cause, ask your vet about anti-nausea medications. If nervousness at being in the car is the culprit, try having your dog sit in the car without going anywhere, providing plenty of praise and treats; then practice taking short trips that end someplace fun.

Bring your dog’s usual food. A sudden switch can upset your dog’s stomach–so not what you want when you’re stuck in the car together.

Try not to feed your dog right before you leave or when you’re on the road. A dog with a full tummy and a car in motion can be a bad combination. Aim for a mealtime three to four hours before you leave, and if you need to feed him on the road, make a pit stop.

Take along a dog bed and toys from home for longer trips. They can comfort your dog when his usual routine is disrupted.

How to avoid an accident

Use a safety harness, barrier, or crate to restrain your dog. If you use a crate, secure it so it doesn’t slide around the car.

Some people think this is a bit obsessive, but think about what happens if you brake suddenly or crash. A restraint will:

  • Protect your dog, by keeping him from hitting the windshield or flying out of the car
  • Protect you and your passengers from being hit by a flying dog
  • Prevent the pile-up that could ensue if your dog flies out of the car and on to the road

At the very least, keep dogs out of the front seat, and definitely out of your lap. Not only can they distract you and cause an accident, small pups can be killed by a deployed air bag.

Don’t leave your dog in the car alone on cold or hot (or even just warm) days. On an 85-degree day, the temperature inside a car hits 102 degrees within 10 minutes, even with the windows cracked open. Just 15 minutes in a hot car can lead to brain damage. And dogs can, and do, freeze to death when left alone in cars in winter.

Don’t let your dog ride in the back of an open truck or hang his head out the window. It’s too easy for a dog to jump or fall out of a truck bed. And even sniffing the breeze from an open window can lead to a vet visit if a pebble or something from the road is kicked up into your dog’s eye.

Bottom line: Cars are one of the best ways to hit the road with your dog. With a few safety precautions and some advance preparation to prevent car ride anxiety and stomach upset, you’ll both be much more likely to enjoy the ride.