Pet-Friendly Dorms: Send Your Pet To College

Many college freshman bring family photos or a favorite blanket from home when they head off for school, but according to the New York Times, today’s freshman are ditching those inanimate objects in favor of something closer to their hearts: they’re bringing along the family pet now that more and more schools are allowing animals in the dorms. The Times reports that institutions that are allowing pets include including Stephens College in Missouri, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Eckerd College in South Florida.

As animal lovers, we understand the appeal of being allowed to bring a cherished pet to college. But as much as we love spending time with animals, we do see some potential hazards. Will the stress of sole pet ownership add to the pressures of college life? Will the dogs bark, for example, and disturb studying students? Will large numbers of loud students upset the animals?

The New York Times piece sparked so many questions about the logistics of allowing pets in dorms that they asked Deb Duren, the vice president for student services at Stephens College, to answer a few follow up questions, addressing many concerns, such as how the school plans to deal with the fur and poop that comes along with a building full of pets.

Duren explains that most of the campus is pet free, with the exception of two residence halls and a wing of a third so students with allergies don’t have to be affected by pets. There are special “poop dumpsters” for handling waste, and they offer doggie daycare to help keep the dogs happy while students are in class.

Even after reading Duren’s responses, we still aren’t sure how we feel about it. Some Paw Nation staffers think it’s a good idea to have pets on campus and others believe it is too problematic.

What do you think? Do pets belong in dorm rooms? Would you bring a pet to college with you? Do you wish you had been able to?

Courtesy of RadioFence.com, a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including Pet Gates, Dog Training Shock Collars and Bark Collars

Blind Dog Has Her Own Seeing-Eye Dog

These two dogs are more than just best friends, they share a rare bond.

Ellie, a young cavalier King Charles spaniel in England, is almost completely blind. While her owner and a local animal organization are working to raise money for a vision-restoring operation, a German shepherd named Leo has taken matters into his own paws, and is protecting and guiding her.

“Ellie has cataracts on both eyes and is only aware of shadows,” explains Jean Spencer, manager of Rochdale’s Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, in an interview with the Manchester Evening News. “But Leo, who’s an absolutely massive dog, has become her eyes. It’s touching to watch them together. She follows him around and snuggles up to him.”

Ellie was part of a litter of five puppies rescued from harsh conditions by the RSPCA, says Julie Lander, an RSPCA volunteer and Leo and Ellie’s owner. “As well as having cataracts, Ellie’s eye muscles haven’t developed as they should have as she’d been kept in the dark. The puppies had no light or heating. I felt so sorry for her when she arrived, and knew she’d need a special home. But I also knew she would be all right with Leo, as he just loves little dogs and they took to one another straight away,” Lander tells the Manchester Evening News.

Lander goes on to explain how Leo’s almost 90 pounds of bulk helps keep his new charge safe. “I take them for walks in the park and Leo guides Ellie around. He is so protective and herds the more boisterous dogs away from her,” Julie says.

No one has commented on whether Leo can actually tell that Ellie is disabled or if he is caring for her based solely on her size. If Ellie’s problem is ever fixed, it will be interesting to see whether she will continue to share the same bond with Leo.

Although they already have had at least one fundraiser, the RSPCA does not yet have enough money to pay for Ellie’s operation. If you would like to donate, go to www.rspca-rochdale.org.uk.

Courtesy of RadioFence.com, a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including Pet Doors, Dog Training Shock Collars and Bark Collars

PetSafe Aquires Premier Pet Products

Radio Systems Corporation, owner of PetSafe, Innotek, and SportDOG branded products has acquired Premier Pet Products.

The Radio Systems team is extremely excited to add Premier to the family of brands. Premier and Radio Systems Corporation have taken different approaches to the market in terms of training philosophy and new product development. We are certain that the expertise we bring together from divergent camps will result in strong new product development and creation of new product categories for you to offer your customer base and strengthen the Human/Animal relationship.

Courtesy of RadioFence.com, a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars.

Summer Vacations With Your Pet

If you are planning a trip, have you considered whether or not your dog gets to come along? Do you know how to travel with your dog? Traveling with your dog can be loads of fun if you make all the right arrangements. However, poor planning can really ruin the vacation for everyone. If you think it would be best for your dog to stay behind, then look for a pet sitter or find a kennel where you can board your dog. If you have decided that your furry companion should be part of your trip, let the planning begin.

Start by keeping a collar with current identification on your dog at all times. A microchip or dog tracking collar may also be beneficial for extra security. Before you travel, your dog should have basic training so he will be well-behaved during the trip. Then, plan the transportation, accommodations and daily activities. Learning how to travel with your dog can make the experience less stressful and a lot of fun!

Travel By Air

Air travel for dogs is not always a great idea. Though canines are not cargo to us pet parents, they are usually considered such by the airlines. The cargo hold does not make for a pleasant travel experience, even for relaxed dogs. This is not to say that flying is not an option, just that it is not ideal. Small dog owners are in luck, though. Some airlines will allow you to bring your pet in a pet carrier if it can fit under the seat in front of you. Learn the finer details of air travel with dogs so you can be fully informed before you book a flight.

Pet-loving entrepreneurs have been developing pet-friendly airlines that may actually be affordable. One such company is Pet Airways, a pet-only (no human passengers) airline that allows pets to fly in the main cabin rather than cargo. However, these flights are only available in a limited number of cities. Until these types of airlines are more accessible, many of us will have to make do with the rules or scrape up the dough to charter a plane.

By Automobile

The automobile is usually the best way to travel with dogs. If you own a vehicle, chances are your dog has ridden in it for trips to the vets, the park and so on. If not, now is the time to start. Some dogs have anxiety over riding in cars. The more positive your dog’s automobile experiences are, the more likely he will enjoy the rides. If your dog only rides in the car for vet visits, and he dislikes the vet, his anxiety is understandable. Try taking him for short, frequent car rides that end up at the park, dog supply store (where he will get a toy or treat), or another pleasant place. If your dog does not adjust to the car, then a road trip is not a good option. If you must bring your dog for a long car ride, ask your vet about possible anti-anxiety medications that can make the trip a bit easier on everyone. Otherwise, you should seek out other options. Remember, medications should be used sparingly.

If you’ve decided that Rover can handle the trip, make sure you make all the proper arrangements.

Plan Ahead

Plot rest stops along the way while traveling with your dog, and plan to stop every 3-5 hours to allow your dog to relieve himself, drink water and stretch his legs (more or less depending on your dog’s needs). Make a list of several veterinary hospitals that are easily accessible from your route, preferably within one hour’s drive from any given point. Check that they will be open during your travel.

Bring for the car ride:

  • Lists of rest stops and veterinary hospitals
  • Leash
  • Dog seat belt or crate / kennel
  • Water and Bowls
  • Treats
  • One or two toys
  • Blanket and/or dog bed
  • Bags to pick up waste
  • Medications, if applicable
  • Your dog’s medical records

Hotels and Dogs

If you will be staying at a hotel while traveling with your dog, cover all your bases in advance. A pet-friendly hotel is more than just one that allows pets – it is one that welcomes them. Some hotels offer special dog beds, turndown service (down to the treat on the pillow), dog spa services and doggie day care. Ask what amenities are available for your dog, but remember to find out what cost is involved. Many hotels charge a non-refundable pet deposit upon arrival, then a daily pet fee. Some even tack on a special cleaning fee. Bottom line, before you choose, do your research about pet-friendly hotels.

Bed and Breakfast / Inns for Dogs

Inns and B&Bs are typically not equipped for dogs. However, they do exist. It is essential that you know how to prepare for the trip prior to finalizing your plans. Learn about bringing your dog to a B&B, then look for a dog-friendly location.

Camping with Dogs

Camping with your dog can be the perfect way to spend time together while communing with nature. However, camping with dogs is not always a wise choice. Before you decide to bring your dog, make sure the campground you are considering actually allows dogs. Many state and national parks do not allow dogs. Above all, learn how to have fun and stay safe while camping.

BE PREPARED

Emergencies do not only happen close to home, they can also happen while traveling with your dog. Advance planning can make these emergencies less stressful. Before the trip, make a list of veterinary hospitals in the area where you will be staying, along with a map. If your dog shows sudden signs of illness, that list can help save your dog’s life. Before you leave for your trip, make sure you have not forgotten anything. Use this list as a guide while you are packing. Add your own personal touch as needed.

  1. Lists of rest stops and veterinary hospitals along your trip (if driving)
  2. List of veterinary hospitals near the location where you are staying
  3. Crate / kennel
  4. Leash
  5. Water and Bowls
  6. Dog Food
  7. Treats
  8. One or two toys
  9. Blankets and/or dog bed
  10. Bags to pick up waste
  11. First Aid Kit
  12. Grooming supplies, if necessary
  13. Medications, if applicable
  14. Your dog’s medical records (including vaccine history)
  15. Health Certificate (obtain from your vet)

Now you’re all set – be safe and enjoy your trip!

Get Active with Your Dog

Spring is coming but it just can’t get here soon enough! Your dog is probably aching to get outside and burn off some energy, and he wants you there with him. Participating in dog sports is a wonderful way to get active and connected with your dog. While many require agreeable weather, other dog sports and activities can be enjoyed indoors. Agility can go either way.

Got a great story about your dog’s accomplishments? We would love it if you would share your story.

This article is courtesy of RadioFence.com a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including  Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars.