Keep Your Dog Cool In The Summer Heat

Whether you see summer as a time to have fun in the sun or take a nap in the shade, it’s important to keep the health and safety of your dog in mind. The warmest months of summer can be a dangerous time for you dog. Here are some tips to help you make sure your dog enjoys the summer as much as you do.

On the Go With Fido

  • Make sure your dog has access to plenty of cool, fresh water 24 hours a day. There are many inexpensive and collapsible bowls (usually plastic or fabric) that you can take with you anywhere and refill at water fountains. If you are going to be out for a long period of time, freeze a bottle of water or bring ice cubes in a Tupperware container so that you will have cold water when you reach your destination.
  • Be aware that asphalt and sand can quickly get hot enough to burn the pads of dogs’ paws, and that your dog’s entire body is much closer to the ground than yours. In hot weather, walk your dog on the grass or dirt where it is cooler.
  • Never leave your dog in a vehicle. When it’s only 80 degrees outside, a car can heat up to over 120 degrees in just minutes and leaving a window cracked does little to prevent heat build-up. Many vets say that this is the most common cause of heat exhaustion.
  • Tying a dog outside a store while you run an errand in never a good idea, but is especially dangerous in the summer since he may be exposed to direct sunlight. If you can’t bring your dog inside the store, it’s best to leave him home.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise on extremely hot days. Take walks in the early mornings or evenings, when heat and humidity are less intense. Remember that if your dog is spending most of her time in air conditioning, the intense weather outdoors will be even harder for her to acclimate to.Consider getting a dog treadmill.
  • Many dogs like swimming, but some cannot swim (Bulldogs, for instance, are too large-boned) or may not like the water. Be conscious of your dog’s preferences and skills before putting him in the water. Always supervise your pet while swimming. Dogs can become easily disoriented in swimming pools and may not be able to find the stairs.

Know the Signs of Heat Exhaustion

  • There are many factors that can make a dog more susceptible to heat exhaustion; physical condition, age, coat type, breed, and the climate it is most acclimated to. Very young and very old dogs are at the most risk. Brachycephalic dogs (those with short muzzles), such as Pugs and Bulldogs, are also at greater risk.
  • Symptoms of heat exhaustion or stroke can include excessive panting, disorientation, and obvious paleness or graying to the gums due to a lack of oxygen. A dog’s natural 102-degree body temperature should never exceed 105 degrees.
  • If you feel your dog is suffering from heat exhaustion or heat stroke, act immediately by submerging her in cool water (not ice cold) or by placing ice packs on her neck. Once the dog has been stabilized get her to a vet.

Keeping Cool

  • If you keep your dogs outside, it’s critical that they have access to shade, and remember that dark-colored dogs absorb more heat than dogs with lighter coats. Dog houses are not good shelter during the summer, as they can trap heat.
  • There are various products that can help keep pets cool, such as fans that clip onto crates and mats with cooling crystals that stay up to 20 degrees below room temperate. These can be used as crate liners or as beds. Collars, vests and other items are also available. For an immediate and inexpensive option, try placing your dog on a wet towel on a concrete or tile floor in front of a fan or air conditioner.
  • Dogs do not sweat and their only means of reducing body heat is by panting. Although it seems incongruous, trimming your dog’s coat will not make him significantly cooler, and you should never shave your dog–his coat helps regulate body temperature and protect from sunburn!

Summer Travel With Your Dog

With pet-friendly hotels, cabins, and resort spots popping up all over the map, traveling with your best friend has never been easier. But while jetting off without planning in advance sounds romantic, it can cause sticky situations if your dog is along for the ride.

Practice first

In any endeavor, practice makes perfect. Your angel of a dog could turn into a devil in transit if you embark on a lengthy trip without preparing properly. But with a little advance work, you can help your pup learn to take travel in stride.

  • Acclimate your dog to his pet carrier or dog crate. Set the carrier up in the comfort of home well in advance, to help your dog view it as a safe and familiar den that’s just his. Be sure the carrier’s big enough so your dog can stand up, turn around, and lie down comfortably.
  • Stick to day trips at first. This is especially helpful for a puppy who hasn’t been away from home much. A Saturday visit to an unfamiliar locale can help your dog get used to exploring new terrain and meeting new people.
  • Try an overnight trip next. Once he’s used to short journeys, arrange to spend a night with a friend or relative, or go to a pet-friendly hotel. This will introduce your dog to a variety of potentially anxiety-producing situations, such as sleeping in a new place, meeting strangers, and dealing with the odd noises of a different household or a hotel.

Prepare your dog for a lengthy trip

Whether you’re setting out via plane, ship, or automobile, take these steps first to prevent problems while you and your dog are away from home:

1. See your veterinarian. Make sure your dog is in good health, is up-to-date on shots, and has enough of any needed medications for the trip. Depending on the destination, the vet may suggest additional vaccinations. For example, if travel involves hiking in the woods, the vet could advise a shot for Lyme disease.

2. Get a health certificate from your vet. This verifies that your dog’s in good condition, and it may be required by some airlines, hotels, or doggie daycare locations in other cities.

3. Talk to the vet about sedatives. These are most important if your pet has had travel anxiety in the past, but you may choose to use them as a precautionary measure. However, your vet may advise against them for airplane travel.

4. Try any new sedatives or medications before you leave. Check to see if your dog has any allergic reactions that require a vet visit.

5. Ask your vet about a microchip. If your dog doesn’t have one already, you may want one as a safeguard against losing him permanently in an unfamiliar place.

6. Know the rules at your destination. For instance, to bring a dog across the border to Mexico, the health certificate must be dated within two weeks of the travel date. Most such certificates will remain valid for 30 days, to cover bringing the dog back into the U.S. at the end of your trip.

7. Research dog-walking routes in advance. Remember, dogs are creatures of routine, and yours will need that daily walk no matter where your vacation spot is–plus he’ll enjoy the adventure of new outings.

Bottom line: Pet-friendly accommodations make it possible to travel widely with your dog–but regulations and requirements mean it’s crucial to plan all the details first.

Fireworks and Dogs Do Not Mix

The 4th of July is Just a few days away, and that means fireworks. Many owners underestimate their dogs when it comes to fireworks. The truth is, even the bravest dogs can become terrified by the sound of fireworks. The most important thing you can do for your dog is to keep her away from fireworks displays. If you plan to go see fireworks, do your dog a favor and leave her home. If fireworks can be heard near your home, keep her indoors for the evening. Continue reading

Summer Camp – For Dogs!

Summer is here, dog lovers, and you know what that means: it’s time to pack up the car and take your pooch to summer camp.

Doggie summer camps are for real, folks, and their level of intensity ranges from day camping and hiking events with like-minded owners to kennel-free boarding at a pet “ranch” to the full-on summer camp experience with you and your pooch taking part in swimming lessons, costume contests and handicrafts.

Here are a several options you can either take advantage of this summer or go ahead and book for 2011.

Sleepaway Camp for Your Dog
For those who fear that their dog is getting a little too citified — or just need to travel without their pet — the Double Dog Ranch offers a service you might describe as adventure boarding. Think of this as a doggie dude ranch where your pup can romp around in the woods while you take a much-needed vacation to the beach. Or if your dog needs a little tutoring in the obedience department, these guys can help out with that too.

The Double Dog Ranch has two locations, one in Northern Oregon and the other in Southern California. For booking info, you can check their available dates online. They’re updated daily. Rates begin at around $40 a day.

A Camp That Caters to You and Your Dog
Just as camps for kids get booked up, so do canine camps. But if you are looking for a summer 2011 destination, consider Canine Club Getaway. This is one of the most hands-on camp experiences available to you and your dog. Canine Club Getaway is one part summer camp, one part dog-friendly resort. In fact, the camp is held at a scenic resort property in Lake George, N.Y.

But just because you’re not roughing it doesn’t mean you don’t get that classic summer-camp experience. Canine Club Getaway provides a smorgasbord of activities for dogs and owners such as “Barks and Crafts,” “Red Light Green Light,” “Guided Hikes,” and even “Doggie Weddings” (not legally binding in most states). “Last year, we had two dogs that were going to breed,” Costa tells Paw Nation, “So we had a little costume party ceremony. It was really fun and it was presided over by our staff Ph.D.”

Rates for summer 2011 start at $1,099 for a single room. If you are looking for a fall getaway, keep checking the camp’s website. Costa says that they’ve “been kicking around the idea of another event in October.” See a video of the camp below.

Day Camping and Hiking with Your Dog
Want to get in on some of this awesome dog camping, but don’t have the time for a week-long summer camp? The Dog Scouts of America might be the place to go for a slightly more introductory-level camping situation. Plus, you can meet like-minded dog owners in your area.

The Dog Scout motto is “Let us learn new things, so that we may become more helpful.” Who doesn’t want their dog to be more helpful? Maybe they can teach your dog how to start a campfire, or at least how to fetch you a cold beverage out of the cooler.

Troops are cropping up all over the nation, and offer dogs and owners the chance to bond over activities like backpacking, day camps, and of course earning merit badges.

Courtesy of RadioFence.com, a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including Pet Gates, Dog Training Shock Collars and Bark Collars.

Pet-Friendly Dorms: Send Your Pet To College

Many college freshman bring family photos or a favorite blanket from home when they head off for school, but according to the New York Times, today’s freshman are ditching those inanimate objects in favor of something closer to their hearts: they’re bringing along the family pet now that more and more schools are allowing animals in the dorms. The Times reports that institutions that are allowing pets include including Stephens College in Missouri, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Eckerd College in South Florida.

As animal lovers, we understand the appeal of being allowed to bring a cherished pet to college. But as much as we love spending time with animals, we do see some potential hazards. Will the stress of sole pet ownership add to the pressures of college life? Will the dogs bark, for example, and disturb studying students? Will large numbers of loud students upset the animals?

The New York Times piece sparked so many questions about the logistics of allowing pets in dorms that they asked Deb Duren, the vice president for student services at Stephens College, to answer a few follow up questions, addressing many concerns, such as how the school plans to deal with the fur and poop that comes along with a building full of pets.

Duren explains that most of the campus is pet free, with the exception of two residence halls and a wing of a third so students with allergies don’t have to be affected by pets. There are special “poop dumpsters” for handling waste, and they offer doggie daycare to help keep the dogs happy while students are in class.

Even after reading Duren’s responses, we still aren’t sure how we feel about it. Some Paw Nation staffers think it’s a good idea to have pets on campus and others believe it is too problematic.

What do you think? Do pets belong in dorm rooms? Would you bring a pet to college with you? Do you wish you had been able to?

Courtesy of RadioFence.com, a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including Pet Gates, Dog Training Shock Collars and Bark Collars