965 Dogs Dead Presumably Caused By Trifexis

965 Dog Deaths Presumably Caused By Trifexis - blog.radiofence.com

965 Dog Deaths Presumably Caused By Trifexis - blog.radiofence.com

Trifexis – the FDA approved monthly medication created to prevent fleas and heart worms for dogs – may not be safe according to more than 965 people who suspect that their dogs have died from the drug.

Trifexis reports on its website that “to receive FDA approval Trifexis was tested in hundreds of dogs, and detailed clinical reports were submitted for intense review. Adverse events are reported to the FDA, and concerns are thoroughly investigated.” Side effects listed for Trifexis include: vomiting, itching, lethargy, diarrhea, dermatitis, skin reddening, decreased appetite, and pinnal reddening.

Preventative Vet has put together an excellent article concerning the allegations against Trifexis by looking at both sides of the issue. Preventative Vet’s answer to people’s question “does Trifexis kill dogs?” is that “there is currently a suspicion, though no conclusive proof, that there may be some significant safety problems with one of the most popular heartworm preventatives — Trifexis. It appears as though these concerns are being taken seriously and are currently under investigation by the appropriate people and agencies.“ 

Speaking from experience, I gave my dogs Zoey and Jem Trifexis after they were both out of the puppy stage as their first flea/heartworm medication. Zoey had the most trouble with the drug.

When she first started taking Trifexis, I was using it strictly as a preventative rather than a “cure” for any pre -existing conditions. She was young and didn’t have a single case of fleas or heart worm problems, but I knew it was important to take precautions. As soon as she started taking Trifexis, I noticed a very severe change in her stool almost immediately. Her stool had this milky white slimy membrane over it which I had never seen before. I was very concerned. The vet examined her and said it was probably a side effect from the Trifexis, and it was not something I needed to worry about (but of course any dog mom is going to worry!) I decided to follow the vet’s advice and give her another dose of Trifexis the next month (the problem with her stool only seemed to last the first two days after taking it). I was very strict about giving her doses exactly when they were due to keep her as protected as possible from fleas or heart worm.

We moved into a rental home with a large back yard, and the previous owners had cats. I began to suspect she had fleas even though she had been taking Trifexis to prevent them. A visit to the vet confirmed that she did in fact have her first case of fleas! I was shocked, disappointed, and felt gipped. I thought I was doing the right thing by giving her Trifexis to prevent fleas, and then she got them anyway as if the product hadn’t worked at all. After the scary side effect she experienced with her stool and a case of the fleas, it was easy for me to make the decision to take her off of Trifexis without any regrets. Since she has been off of it, she has never had that problem with her stool again and has been 100% flea-free. She now receives a heart worm shot from her vet twice a year that lasts 6 months, and I give her K9 Advantix because she spends lots of time in the woods where we have seen ticks.

The most popular news story covering this topic can be viewed below:

Only you can make the choice when it comes to deciding which flea and heart worm preventatives are best for your family’s dog. Having said that, I think it is extremely important that we all do our own research and understand as best we can all of the options out there and learn from the experiences of others. If Trifexis is causing other peoples’ dogs to have problems and many of them suspect it is the cause of death for their precious pups, then you might decide to air on the side of caution and think carefully before giving it to your dog.

On the other hand, I completely agree with Preventative Vet’s advice on this Trifexis dilemma when they say that “while the investigation is ongoing, you shouldn’t panic and you shouldn’t jump to conclusions – especially if your dog has been safely on Trifexis for some time now. However, If you do decide to change preventatives — which is your right and there are lots of other effective medications out there for you and your veterinarian to choose from — you should be sure to do so only with the counseling and input of your veterinarian.” Couldn’t have said it better myself!

 

“Walk for a Dog” App Donates To Animal Shelters Every Time You Walk Your Dog

335,000 miles and counting. That’s how far thousands of people and their dogs in all 50 states have walked to help raise money for animal rescues and shelters at no cost to them thanks to the Walk for a Dog app from WoofTrax.

For those of us who care so deeply about the helpless animals that are sitting in shelters but can’t afford to budget the extra cash to donate, there’s finally an app that easily relieves us of this stress! All you have to do is download the Walk for a Dog app, take your phone with you on the walk, press “start”, and watch as you raise money with every step! The app automatically finds the shelter closest to you, but you can change your choice of shelters as many times as you want. Donations range from 11-25 cents per mile, but the more people that use the app the more WoofTrax can donate!

The animals in shelters are depending on us, and all we have to do to help them is tell our family and friends about this amazing program. The money WoofTrax donates to animal shelters comes from sponsorships, advertising, and investors. As the number of people that use the app increases, the number of investors and advertisements increases which means more money going to the shelters! Let’s do our part to spread the word to all of our friends and our local shelters so they can help promote it as well. The shelters already receiving donations:

If you or your friends are dog lovers but not dog owners, you can still use this app to show support by walking the dogs at your local shelter by choosing the “Walk for Cassie” option or create your virtual dream dog on the app as your walking companion!

We can all make a huge difference by using and promoting this app, and all we have to do is simply take walks with our best friend– free of charge! I can’t imagine going on another walk with Zoey and Jem without using this app and will feel so great knowing we have saved shelter pets by simply adding one extra step to our daily walk routine.

See what people are saying about Walk for a Dog:

“I downloaded the Walk for a Dog app and used it today for the first time. Great to know that just by doing what I do every day, walking my dog, I can help the dogs at the Monmouth County SPCA. It’s also good to know how much I am walking – close to my first mile!” - Lynne, New Jersey

Homeless and Inseparable: Two Dogs Find Their Happily Ever After

If you didn’t already believe that dogs are some of the most selfless and loyal beings on earth, you will now. A homeless long-haired Chihuahua and a Pit Bull mix were found roaming the streets of Savannah, Georgia together. What shocked the officials who found them is how they wouldn’t leave each other’s side. The Pit Bull carried the injured Chihuahua everywhere they went, only taking a break to lick the Chihuahua’s infected eye wound.

After the Chihuahua had eye surgery, the two were reunited and were overjoyed to see each other again, “licking, whining, caressing and finally cuddling.” They have been named Joanie and Chachi in honor of their inseparable relationship and extremely close bond. “It’s not every day we get to see such devotion between two special dogs like this,” Animal Control Officer Christina Sutherin said. “They are both such sweet animals. But the relationship they share just sets them apart.”

Joanie and Chachi Are Inseperable

Emails and social media posts have been flooding into the police department with people asking to adopt the pair and keep them together forever. The SCMPD Facebook page announced that the duo have been officially adopted and will be enjoying their new home in sunny Florida come August. The department said Joanie and Chachi showed extreme excitement when they were told they found a forever home for them together.

Joanie and Chachi Find A Home

“Neither one seems to care about another dog they are exposed to, only each other,” says Sutherin. “They truly appear to be soul mates.”

Do Our Pets Smile?

Pavlov might have called that happy look on your dog’s face a collection of conditioned reflexes, but now science is catching up with what animal lovers have always known.

According to Professor Nicholas Dodman, head of animal behavior at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts School of Medicine and a regular on Animal Planet’s Dogs 101 and Cats 101, until recently, scientists have generally underestimated the emotional range of animals. He says that today it is widely understood by scientists that mammals do experience primary emotions such as fear, sadness, anger, and happiness and even some secondary emotions like jealously and embarrassment-and they communicate them. Dodman says that dogs even have a sense of humor and laugh with a kind of huffing sound. He describes a study that examines how playing recordings of this laughing sound actually calms shelter dogs.

It’s an expression that disarms possible aggression, much like the human smile.” Cats have naturally bowed mouths, so Dodman says its tricky to pinpoint an actual smile, but they are emotionally sensitive, trainable, and affectionate. Among many other pets, Dodman has enjoyed sharing his home with rats, which he says are “very affectionate and intelligent.” Dodman, points out that your pet might not understand the exact details of your hard day, but you probably sense it is empathetic enough to curl up and listen.

Marc Bekoff, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado and author of The Animal Manifesto: Six Reasons for Increasing our Compassion Footprint, agrees. “People are often keener observers of animal behavior than they give themselves credit for,” says the leading expert on animal emotions. Bekoff says that scientific research, for the most part, eventually confirms what animal lovers intuit and observe. Part of the lag is due to “studying animals in a box” as Dodman calls it. Dodman, who is giving a series of lectures on dog and cat behavior in November, explains that our advances in understanding the richness and depth of animal’s lives is enhanced by researchers such as Jane Goodall who live with animals in their natural environments.

Bekoff points out that it makes biological and evolutionary sense for animals to experience a range of emotions and be able to show them, just as it does for humans. In a paper published by researchers from the University of Washington on rats, laughter, and joy, the authors describe how young rats vocalize when being tickled. The scientists explain that this laughter is bonding and “may have evolutionary relations to the joyfulness of human childhood laughter commonly accompanying social play.” Bekoff says our emotions might not be exactly analogous to those of animals, but neither are all humans’ emotions the same. “The way two siblings experience the death of a parent might not be exactly the same, but they are both experiencing grief.”

We believe our pets do smile and laugh. Does your pet? Let us know what you think.

 

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