Important Dog Food Recall Notice


On Tuesday August 26 Pedigree released a voluntary notice of a recall of 22 bags of Pedigree Adult Complete Nutrition dry dog food because of “the possible presence of a foreign material.” Pedigree knows that the affected bags were only 15 pound bags sold in Dollar General stores in Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Louisiana. Pedigree believes that there are “small metal fragments” that may “present a risk of injury if consumed.” However they claim the metal fragments are not “embedded in the food itself.” They are working with Dollar General to get the bags removed from inventory to ensure they are not sold to consumers.

If you have purchased a 15 pound bag of Pedigree Adult Complete Nutrition dry dog food from a Dollar General in any of those four states, you can examine the bag to see if yours is one included in the recall. Affected bags have the lot code “432C1KKM03″ printed on the back near the UPC code (23100 10944) and “Best Before 8/5/15″ date.

Pedigree Recall Information from blog.radiofence.com

Pedigree says that no other dog food bags are affected by this recall. If you have any friends or family with dogs that might be affected by this recall, please help by sharing this post via social media so as many people are informed of this as possible.

965 Dogs Dead Presumably Caused By Trifexis

965 Dog Deaths Presumably Caused By Trifexis - blog.radiofence.com

965 Dog Deaths Presumably Caused By Trifexis - blog.radiofence.com

Trifexis – the FDA approved monthly medication created to prevent fleas and heart worms for dogs – may not be safe according to more than 965 people who suspect that their dogs have died from the drug.

Trifexis reports on its website that “to receive FDA approval Trifexis was tested in hundreds of dogs, and detailed clinical reports were submitted for intense review. Adverse events are reported to the FDA, and concerns are thoroughly investigated.” Side effects listed for Trifexis include: vomiting, itching, lethargy, diarrhea, dermatitis, skin reddening, decreased appetite, and pinnal reddening.

Preventative Vet has put together an excellent article concerning the allegations against Trifexis by looking at both sides of the issue. Preventative Vet’s answer to people’s question “does Trifexis kill dogs?” is that “there is currently a suspicion, though no conclusive proof, that there may be some significant safety problems with one of the most popular heartworm preventatives — Trifexis. It appears as though these concerns are being taken seriously and are currently under investigation by the appropriate people and agencies.“ 

Speaking from experience, I gave my dogs Zoey and Jem Trifexis after they were both out of the puppy stage as their first flea/heartworm medication. Zoey had the most trouble with the drug.

When she first started taking Trifexis, I was using it strictly as a preventative rather than a “cure” for any pre -existing conditions. She was young and didn’t have a single case of fleas or heart worm problems, but I knew it was important to take precautions. As soon as she started taking Trifexis, I noticed a very severe change in her stool almost immediately. Her stool had this milky white slimy membrane over it which I had never seen before. I was very concerned. The vet examined her and said it was probably a side effect from the Trifexis, and it was not something I needed to worry about (but of course any dog mom is going to worry!) I decided to follow the vet’s advice and give her another dose of Trifexis the next month (the problem with her stool only seemed to last the first two days after taking it). I was very strict about giving her doses exactly when they were due to keep her as protected as possible from fleas or heart worm.

We moved into a rental home with a large back yard, and the previous owners had cats. I began to suspect she had fleas even though she had been taking Trifexis to prevent them. A visit to the vet confirmed that she did in fact have her first case of fleas! I was shocked, disappointed, and felt gipped. I thought I was doing the right thing by giving her Trifexis to prevent fleas, and then she got them anyway as if the product hadn’t worked at all. After the scary side effect she experienced with her stool and a case of the fleas, it was easy for me to make the decision to take her off of Trifexis without any regrets. Since she has been off of it, she has never had that problem with her stool again and has been 100% flea-free. She now receives a heart worm shot from her vet twice a year that lasts 6 months, and I give her K9 Advantix because she spends lots of time in the woods where we have seen ticks.

The most popular news story covering this topic can be viewed below:

Only you can make the choice when it comes to deciding which flea and heart worm preventatives are best for your family’s dog. Having said that, I think it is extremely important that we all do our own research and understand as best we can all of the options out there and learn from the experiences of others. If Trifexis is causing other peoples’ dogs to have problems and many of them suspect it is the cause of death for their precious pups, then you might decide to air on the side of caution and think carefully before giving it to your dog.

On the other hand, I completely agree with Preventative Vet’s advice on this Trifexis dilemma when they say that “while the investigation is ongoing, you shouldn’t panic and you shouldn’t jump to conclusions – especially if your dog has been safely on Trifexis for some time now. However, If you do decide to change preventatives — which is your right and there are lots of other effective medications out there for you and your veterinarian to choose from — you should be sure to do so only with the counseling and input of your veterinarian.” Couldn’t have said it better myself!

 

“Walk for a Dog” App Donates To Animal Shelters Every Time You Walk Your Dog

335,000 miles and counting. That’s how far thousands of people and their dogs in all 50 states have walked to help raise money for animal rescues and shelters at no cost to them thanks to the Walk for a Dog app from WoofTrax.

For those of us who care so deeply about the helpless animals that are sitting in shelters but can’t afford to budget the extra cash to donate, there’s finally an app that easily relieves us of this stress! All you have to do is download the Walk for a Dog app, take your phone with you on the walk, press “start”, and watch as you raise money with every step! The app automatically finds the shelter closest to you, but you can change your choice of shelters as many times as you want. Donations range from 11-25 cents per mile, but the more people that use the app the more WoofTrax can donate!

The animals in shelters are depending on us, and all we have to do to help them is tell our family and friends about this amazing program. The money WoofTrax donates to animal shelters comes from sponsorships, advertising, and investors. As the number of people that use the app increases, the number of investors and advertisements increases which means more money going to the shelters! Let’s do our part to spread the word to all of our friends and our local shelters so they can help promote it as well. The shelters already receiving donations:

If you or your friends are dog lovers but not dog owners, you can still use this app to show support by walking the dogs at your local shelter by choosing the “Walk for Cassie” option or create your virtual dream dog on the app as your walking companion!

We can all make a huge difference by using and promoting this app, and all we have to do is simply take walks with our best friend– free of charge! I can’t imagine going on another walk with Zoey and Jem without using this app and will feel so great knowing we have saved shelter pets by simply adding one extra step to our daily walk routine.

See what people are saying about Walk for a Dog:

“I downloaded the Walk for a Dog app and used it today for the first time. Great to know that just by doing what I do every day, walking my dog, I can help the dogs at the Monmouth County SPCA. It’s also good to know how much I am walking – close to my first mile!” - Lynne, New Jersey

LA SPCA Helps Gulf Coast Pets

The Gulf oil spill has been the biggest man-made environmental disaster in years. We have all been sickened by stories and photos of pelicans, turtles, and other sea life blackened by the crude oil in the gulf coast. Larry West, About.com expert on environment, believes that the environmental damage will be long-lasting. He says, “In addition to the thousands of fish, reptiles, birds and marine mammals that will die as a direct result of the oil spill, the long-term damage to marine species in the Gulf is what really has scientists and environmentalists worried.”

The oil spill disaster has also exacerbated the economic crisis, for those people who work in the fishing industry in the gulf coast. As with most economic downturns, pets often are the first to suffer, and more and more families impacted by the BP/Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill are relinquishing their cats and dogs to shelters. The Louisiana SPCA, in partnership with the ASPCA, Best Friends, and several other charitable groups is stepping in to provide veterinary care for pet owners economically impacted by the oil spill. Learn more about this humane program from the Louisiana SPCA announcement.