99% of all Puppies Sold Online and in Pet Stores are from Puppy Mills


Many of us want to experience the amazing companionship that comes with having a dog of our very own. But millions of people have been naturally conditioned to think “I want to go to the pet store and buy a puppy!” or “let’s look online for breeders!” rather than their instinct being to visit their local animal shelter.

The assumption that so many of us have been accustomed to believing is that we have to find a breeder to get a purebred dog. That is so far from true! The ASPCA says, “purebred dogs end up in shelters just like mixed breeds. Breed rescue groups exist for just about every breed possible. If you have your heart set on a purebred, please be sure to visit your local shelter or find a breed rescue group before searching for a breeder. If you can’t find what you want through a shelter or breed rescue group, please learn how to recognize a responsible breeder.

The harsh reality that most people aren’t aware of is that 99% of all dogs sold in pet stores and online are from a PUPPY MILL, and almost 100% of these puppies are infested with parasites when you purchase them. The ASPCA defines a puppy mill as “a large-scale commercial dog breeding operation that places profit over the well-being of its dogs—who are often severely neglected—and acts without regard to responsible breeding practices. Unlike responsible breeders, who place the utmost importance on producing the healthiest puppies possible, breeding at puppy mills is performed without consideration of genetic quality. This results in generations of dogs with unchecked hereditary defects. Some puppy mill puppies are sold to pet shops—usually through a broker, or middleman—and marketed as young as eight weeks of age. The lineage records of puppy mill dogs are often falsified. Other puppy mill puppies are sold directly to the public, including over the Internet, through newspaper ads, and at swap meets and flea markets.”

Dogs used for breeding are usually kept in cages with wire floors which injure their paws and legs. Cages are sometimes stacked on top of each other and lined up in columns, so waste falls on the dogs in the cages below them. Poor health, matting, sores, mange, severe dental disease and abscesses are usually widespread with puppy mill dogs. Many sick puppies manage to end up at pet stores and the new puppy owner unknowingly purchases the sick dog.

According to the ASPCA “No Pet Store Puppies” Website:

There are roughly 10,000 puppy mills in the US with Missouri and Oklahoma producing HALF of all the puppies sold in pet stores alone. Some puppy mills can have up to 1,000 adult dogs breeding at once and up to 400 puppies born every year – more than one born per day. Every year there are approximately 4 MILLION puppies born in puppy mills but only about 2,000,000 are sold online and in pet stores because many are born with or develop physical problems that make them unwanted and either end up abandoned or left to die.

Madonna of the Mills, a courageous woman who dedicates her life to saving dogs trapped and tortured in puppy mills, explains that “almost every puppy sold in a pet store has a mother who will spend her entire life in a tiny cage, never being petted, never being walked, never being treated like a dog.” Breeding dogs usually spend their entire lives outdoors and the females usually have little or no recovery time between litters. When the females can no longer reproduce after a few years, the dogs are usually abandoned, shot, or starved until they eventually die.

If you still think that your breeder or pet store is telling the truth about their ethical breeding practices because they are “USDA licensed,” here’s what ASPCA has to say about that:

Below is the trailer for Dog by Dog, a documentary “that aims to wake up the American public to the horrible realities of puppy mills by following the money trail across the United States and confronting those that have maintained this corrupt and irresponsible system.”

There was also a special episode on the Oprah show dedicated to exposing puppy mills after she saw a billboard just off the Kennedy Expressway in Chicago that said ”Oprah: Do a show on puppy mills. The dogs need you” created by Bill Smith, the founder of Main Line Animal Rescue.

There are people out there like the ones you see in the videos that have the resources  and the means to expose the torturous conditions the dogs are living in. But without your help to spread their messages and get the word out to the masses, these dogs will continue to suffer.

Just to give you an idea of how little attention this horrible epidemic receives: The Madonna of the Mills trailer was posted on YouTube 3 years ago has only been viewed 2,007 times as of today. The Oprah episode is the only copy of the show on YouTube and has been viewed 464 times. The dog by dog documentary trailer was posted nearly a year ago and has only received 5,834 views.

People are constantly sharing “viral videos” on social media and talking about them with their friends, so why aren’t videos and documentaries as important as these being shared or viewed just as much if not more?

You are probably feeling just as as troubled, devastated, sick, hurt, and helpless as I am after learning about puppy mills. But you CAN do something to help! It is as easy as SHARING the knowledge and taking a stand against purchasing puppies from pet stores and online! The more people that learn what is going on, take a stand against puppy mills, and stop buying from pet stores that sell puppies, the less puppy mills there will be until they become extinct all together. If no one is buying the puppies, the money-hungry puppy mill owners will have no choice but to stop the cruelty.

There are so many shocking facts and lessons to be learned about puppy mills that cannot possibly be explained in one blog post, so please do more research for yourself and read the ASPCA FAQ’s about puppy mills. 

 

 

Vet Shocked to Find 43.5 Socks Inside a Dog’s Stomach

Vet Shocked to Find 43.5 Socks Inside Dog's Stomach - blog.radiofence.com

A three-year-old Great Dane in Portland, Oregon was rushed to the DoveLewis emergency animal hospital after his owners realized he was vomiting and suffering from extreme pain. An x-ray revealed “a stomach full of a large quantity of foreign material.” He was rushed into surgery, and two hours later Dr. Ashlee Magee was shocked by what she discovered: 43.5 socks inside the dog’s stomach! The dog made a full recovery, however the socks did not.

Vet Shocked to Find 43.5 Socks Inside Dog's Stomach - blog.radiofence.com

The animal hospital’s spokeswoman, Shawna Harch, told news reporters that “it’s perhaps the strangest case in the hospital’s history and certainly the record set for the most socks eaten.” She said the owners were unavailable for comment, and she couldn’t release their names.

Now that I think about it… would you notice if 22 pairs of your socks were missing? Do you even own 22 pairs of socks? I certainly don’t!

The vet hospital heard of a contest hosted by Veterinary Practice News which is a magazine for vets. The contest has been going on for nearly 10 years and is called “They Ate WHAT?” To enter, vets had to submit an x-ray and case details. DoveLewis vet hospital came in third place and won $500! They are using the money for a fund to help low-income families pay for vet bills.

I would love to hear from you! Have your pets eaten anything they shouldn’t have or have they needed surgery? Comment below :)

Important Dog Food Recall Notice


On Tuesday August 26 Pedigree released a voluntary notice of a recall of 22 bags of Pedigree Adult Complete Nutrition dry dog food because of “the possible presence of a foreign material.” Pedigree knows that the affected bags were only 15 pound bags sold in Dollar General stores in Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Louisiana. Pedigree believes that there are “small metal fragments” that may “present a risk of injury if consumed.” However they claim the metal fragments are not “embedded in the food itself.” They are working with Dollar General to get the bags removed from inventory to ensure they are not sold to consumers.

If you have purchased a 15 pound bag of Pedigree Adult Complete Nutrition dry dog food from a Dollar General in any of those four states, you can examine the bag to see if yours is one included in the recall. Affected bags have the lot code “432C1KKM03″ printed on the back near the UPC code (23100 10944) and “Best Before 8/5/15″ date.

Pedigree Recall Information from blog.radiofence.com

Pedigree says that no other dog food bags are affected by this recall. If you have any friends or family with dogs that might be affected by this recall, please help by sharing this post via social media so as many people are informed of this as possible.

965 Dogs Dead Presumably From Trifexis

965 Dog Deaths Presumably Caused By Trifexis - blog.radiofence.com

965 Dog Deaths Presumably Caused By Trifexis - blog.radiofence.com

Trifexis – the FDA approved monthly medication created to prevent fleas and heart worms for dogs – may not be safe according to more than 965 people who suspect that their dogs have died from the drug.

Trifexis reports on its website that “to receive FDA approval Trifexis was tested in hundreds of dogs, and detailed clinical reports were submitted for intense review. Adverse events are reported to the FDA, and concerns are thoroughly investigated.” Side effects listed for Trifexis include: vomiting, itching, lethargy, diarrhea, dermatitis, skin reddening, decreased appetite, and pinnal reddening.

Preventative Vet has put together an excellent article concerning the allegations against Trifexis by looking at both sides of the issue. Preventative Vet’s answer to people’s question “does Trifexis kill dogs?” is that “there is currently a suspicion, though no conclusive proof, that there may be some significant safety problems with one of the most popular heartworm preventatives — Trifexis. It appears as though these concerns are being taken seriously and are currently under investigation by the appropriate people and agencies.“ 

Speaking from experience, I gave my dogs Zoey and Jem Trifexis after they were both out of the puppy stage as their first flea/heartworm medication. Zoey had the most trouble with the drug.

When she first started taking Trifexis, I was using it strictly as a preventative rather than a “cure” for any pre -existing conditions. She was young and didn’t have a single case of fleas or heart worm problems, but I knew it was important to take precautions. As soon as she started taking Trifexis, I noticed a very severe change in her stool almost immediately. Her stool had this milky white slimy membrane over it which I had never seen before. I was very concerned. The vet examined her and said it was probably a side effect from the Trifexis, and it was not something I needed to worry about (but of course any dog mom is going to worry!) I decided to follow the vet’s advice and give her another dose of Trifexis the next month (the problem with her stool only seemed to last the first two days after taking it). I was very strict about giving her doses exactly when they were due to keep her as protected as possible from fleas or heart worm.

We moved into a rental home with a large back yard, and the previous owners had cats. I began to suspect she had fleas even though she had been taking Trifexis to prevent them. A visit to the vet confirmed that she did in fact have her first case of fleas! I was shocked, disappointed, and felt gipped. I thought I was doing the right thing by giving her Trifexis to prevent fleas, and then she got them anyway as if the product hadn’t worked at all. After the scary side effect she experienced with her stool and a case of the fleas, it was easy for me to make the decision to take her off of Trifexis without any regrets. Since she has been off of it, she has never had that problem with her stool again and has been 100% flea-free. She now receives a heart worm shot from her vet twice a year that lasts 6 months, and I give her K9 Advantix because she spends lots of time in the woods where we have seen ticks.

The most popular news story covering this topic can be viewed below:

Only you can make the choice when it comes to deciding which flea and heart worm preventatives are best for your family’s dog. Having said that, I think it is extremely important that we all do our own research and understand as best we can all of the options out there and learn from the experiences of others. If Trifexis is causing other peoples’ dogs to have problems and many of them suspect it is the cause of death for their precious pups, then you might decide to air on the side of caution and think carefully before giving it to your dog.

On the other hand, I completely agree with Preventative Vet’s advice on this Trifexis dilemma when they say that “while the investigation is ongoing, you shouldn’t panic and you shouldn’t jump to conclusions – especially if your dog has been safely on Trifexis for some time now. However, If you do decide to change preventatives — which is your right and there are lots of other effective medications out there for you and your veterinarian to choose from — you should be sure to do so only with the counseling and input of your veterinarian.” Couldn’t have said it better myself!

 

Why Do Some Dogs Sleep On Their Backs?

It doesn’t seem to matter when or where my dog Zoey is sleeping or lounging around, she almost always goes belly-side up! As soon as I put her in the passenger’s seat of my car, she flops onto her back and stares at me with her adorable little upside-down grin (I bring her everywhere I can with me!).

ZoeyTheAussie

When she hops up onto the couch in the living room, she almost always flips over and hangs out belly up! She will look around and stare sweetly at everyone in the room, and you can’t help but smile when you see her lounging.

Even when she is in play-mode, she will grab a toy and roll over onto her back with the toy between her front paws and toss it up in the air to amuse herself. It is one of the cutest things she does, and hangers are her favorite “toy!”

ZoeyTheAussie

She will also follow me to bed, press her nose against me a few times to tell me she is ready to play her favorite game: “bite the mysterious human hands under the covers.” She can’t go to bed before she wrestles with her Beagle sister Jem. After play time, she rolls over onto her back when she is ready to try to fall asleep. She will lay there in this cute pose for a few minutes until I see her slowly drifting off to sleep.

My first thought when Zoey sleeps, plays, and hangs out laying on her back is how adorable and funny it is, but I have recently started to wonder if there are real reasons behind why she does this and how common it is for dogs to lay belly-up, so I did some research:

According to Vet Street, 5-10% of domesticated dogs sleep on their backs. Zoey is part of the minority!

It’s a Sign of Security

According to an article I read on The Daily Puppy, the happiest and most secure dogs go belly-up and sleep on their backs. A sound-sleeping dog on her back demonstrates that she is extremely comfortable around you and feels very safe (Yay for Zoey!). Dogs will most likely not sleep on their backs if they are not feeling secure, because this position exposes their more vulnerable area.

It’s Comfortable

Sleeping belly-up is likely to be the most comfortable position for dogs because their muscles can completely relax. Dogs that sleep on their stomachs or curled up in a ball still have their muscles tensed which is not as comfortable. Back-sleepers have their muscles completely un-tensed, are the most relaxed, and tend to sleep deeper.

It Helps Them Cool Off

Sleeping on their backs helps dogs cool off when they are feeling too warm. Exposing their stomachs helps them cool off faster. The stomach has the least amount of fur, so flopping over feels like shedding a layer of clothing for dogs. This is one of the reasons Zoey will go belly-up in the car. After a long walk in the park, she exposes her belly as a way to cool down.

They Use it to Show Affection

Dogs who sleep on their backs also tend to be good communicators who want to use their body language to show you that they are feeling happy! Especially during playtime, happy dogs will roll over hoping for a rewarding belly rub. If your dog trusts you, she will invite and appreciate a good tummy scratch. Affectionate back-sleepers will lie pressed against their owners or other dogs to give you love and show you that they trust you. Sleeping in this close position allows your dog to feel like she is bonding with you and protecting you.

Zoey has slept pressed right up against my side ever since she was 1 year old, and it still melts my heart to this day! I feel such a strong bond with her when she sleeps so close to me. She may not be able to tell me how she is feeling (although sometimes I really wish she could!), but she sure does show me how happy she is which means everything to me!

I would love to hear from you! Does your dog love being on his or her back like Zoey? Share your stories and/or photos with me in the comments. :)