“Walk for a Dog” App Donates To Animal Shelters Every Time You Walk Your Dog

335,000 miles and counting. That’s how far thousands of people and their dogs in all 50 states have walked to help raise money for animal rescues and shelters at no cost to them thanks to the Walk for a Dog app from WoofTrax.

For those of us who care so deeply about the helpless animals that are sitting in shelters but can’t afford to budget the extra cash to donate, there’s finally an app that easily relieves us of this stress! All you have to do is download the Walk for a Dog app, take your phone with you on the walk, press “start”, and watch as you raise money with every step! The app automatically finds the shelter closest to you, but you can change your choice of shelters as many times as you want. Donations range from 11-25 cents per mile, but the more people that use the app the more WoofTrax can donate!

The animals in shelters are depending on us, and all we have to do to help them is tell our family and friends about this amazing program. The money WoofTrax donates to animal shelters comes from sponsorships, advertising, and investors. As the number of people that use the app increases, the number of investors and advertisements increases which means more money going to the shelters! Let’s do our part to spread the word to all of our friends and our local shelters so they can help promote it as well. The shelters already receiving donations:

If you or your friends are dog lovers but not dog owners, you can still use this app to show support by walking the dogs at your local shelter by choosing the “Walk for Cassie” option or create your virtual dream dog on the app as your walking companion!

We can all make a huge difference by using and promoting this app, and all we have to do is simply take walks with our best friend– free of charge! I can’t imagine going on another walk with Zoey and Jem without using this app and will feel so great knowing we have saved shelter pets by simply adding one extra step to our daily walk routine.

See what people are saying about Walk for a Dog:

“I downloaded the Walk for a Dog app and used it today for the first time. Great to know that just by doing what I do every day, walking my dog, I can help the dogs at the Monmouth County SPCA. It’s also good to know how much I am walking – close to my first mile!” - Lynne, New Jersey

12 Foods Your Dog Can’t Have

We are all guilty of feeling the urge to feed dogs “table scraps” when they give us those sad puppy dog eyes. They know just how to reel us in by putting on their sweet charm. It is so important to be aware of the foods that can make dogs sick or kill them before you make the decision to give in and feed them a piece of your food.

Grapes & Raisins


It is extremely important that your dog never eats these because they cause kidney failure. If a dog already has health problems, the signs of kidney failure from eating grapes or raisins will be dramatic.

Symptoms:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Lethargy

 

 Avocado

Avocados contain a toxin called persin, which is mildly poisonous to dogs and deadly to other animals.  The biggest risk with avocados is that they can cause obstruction if they are swallowed whole, and the seeds are large enough to block the intestinal tracts of smaller dogs.

Symptoms:

  • Intestinal problems
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of stool production

 

Onion & Garlic

Onions are the more dangerous than garlic and can cause the dog’s red blood cells to burst. Poisoning occurs a few days after the dog has eaten the onion.  All forms of onion are problematic including dehydrated, raw, cooked, and table scraps. Garlic is less toxic, and the dog would have to eat a large amount to experience complications. Occasional low doses of these foods are found in some dog foods and are not likely to cause a serious problem.

Symptoms:

  • Labored breathing
  • Liver damage
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Discolored urine

 

Mushrooms

Certain species of mushrooms can be fatal for dogs. The most commonly reported severely toxic mushroom is amanita phalloides.

Symptoms:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Drooling
  • Liver damage
  • Kidney damage
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Convulsions
  • Coma
  • Death

 

Yeast Dough

Yeast dough is meant to rise, and when it is ingested it causes gas to accumulate in the dog’s digestive system. This can be painful and cause the stomach or intestines to rupture. After the yeast has fully risen, the risk is gone and pets can have small pieces of bread. Bread does not have strong nutritional value for dogs, so do not allow your pet to have more than 5-10% of its calories be from bread each day.

 

Chocolate

Cocoa seeds contain methylxanthines, which can be found in other caffeinated foods. Chocolate contains the chemical theobromine that is toxic to dogs. The darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is for your dog. Baker’s, semi-sweet, and dark chocolates are the most dangerous. Many people assume their dog is unaffected by consuming chocolate, but be warned that signs of toxic consumption may not occur for several hours after ingestion, and death can occur within 24 hours.

Symptoms:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Increased heart rate
  • Panting
  • Excessive thirst and urination
  • Hyperactivity
  • Abnormal heart rhythm
  • Seizures
  • Death

 

Macadamia Nuts and Walnuts

These nuts are very commonly used in cookies and candies, so make sure you do not let your dog get ahold of them. As few as six raw or roasted macadamia nuts can make a dog very sick. Their high phosphorus content leads to bladder stones. Dogs develop a tremor of the skeletal muscles, weakness, and sometimes paralysis of their hindquarters. Signs of illness from consumption of these nuts usually appear within 12 hours and last up to two days.

Symptoms:

  • Weakness
  • Panting
  • Depression
  • Vomiting
  • Muscle tremors
  • Hyperthermia
  • Swollen limbs

 

Salt

Consumption of large amounts of salt causes excess thirst and urination, which can result in sodium poisoning. Many dog foods contain large amounts of sodium to make the food taste better. Make sure to check your dog’s food for sodium content and feed him healthy food and treats.

Symptoms:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Depression
  • Tremors
  • Elevated body temperature
  • Seizures
  • Death

 

Xylitol

This sugar substitute is EXTREMELY dangerous for dogs. Even small amounts can cause extreme complications or death. If xylitol is one of the first 3-5 ingredients listed, then it is going to poison your dog. Symptoms appear as quickly as 15-30 minutes after consumption.

Symptoms:

  • Liver failure
  • Hypoglycemia (life-threatening low blood sugar)
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of coordination
  • Seizures
  • Black stool
  • Death

 

Alcohol/Food Containing Alcohol

Alcohol is extremely hazardous to give to your dog, and even a small amount can be very toxic. Hops (the plant used to brew beers) is also toxic to dogs.

Symptoms:

  • Low body temperature
  • Neurological depression
  • Low blood pressure
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Decreased coordination
  • Respiratory failure
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death

 

Milk/Milk-Based Products

Dogs are not born with a substantial amount of lactase in their bodies, which is an enzyme that breaks down the lactose in the milk. There are lactose-free milk products available for pets.

Symptoms:

  • Diarrhea
  • Digestive discomfort

 

Coffee/Caffeine

A large enough amount of caffeine can be fatal to a dog, and there is no antidote once they have consumed too much. Caffeine can be found in common items like tea, coffee beans and grounds, cocoa, chocolate, soft drinks, energy drinks, cold medicines, and painkillers.

Symptoms:

  • Restlessness
  • Rapid breathing
  • Heart palpitations
  • Muscle tremors
  • Bleeding

 

The safest decision you can make as a dog owner is to only feed them their food and treats. However, if you make the decision to treat your dog to some tastier, more human cuisine, always remember what is safe to feed them. To be extra careful, it is a good idea to have important emergency phone numbers on your refrigerator or somewhere you and your guests can easily access them. Included on this list should be your vet, the closest emergency vet clinic, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Hotline: (888) 426-4435. Food is a wonderful part of life, and it is our job as pet parents to make sure our dogs have a safe and healthy experience.

Here are all of the foods your dog should not eat in one easy to use image for your convenience. You can even keep it posted on your refrigerator as a reminder for you and your guests.

 

Jerky Treats Killing Dogs, Cats – 2013 Recall for Dog Food Treats

Jerky treats are killing dogs (and some cats) and after an earlier recall, the FDA is seeking more information on dog food treats that have been sold over the last few years that may have sickened pets.

Most of the jerky treats implicated have been made in China.

Pet owners are concerned now that new numbers have been released and it has been revealed that almost 600 pets have died from illnesses linked to the dog treats.

Some of the cases have have involved “kidney failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, and a rare kidney disorder. About 60 percent of cases involved gastrointestinal illness, and about 30 percent involved kidney and urinary systems.”

What should pet owners do?

The best thing to do is to only buy treats made in the USA.

If you ignore the warnings and still feed your dogs the treats and your pet becomes sick, the government agency warns to”stop the treats immediately, consider seeing your veterinarian, and save any remaining treats and the packaging for possible testing.

Circovirus scare: Keep facts in perspective – AVMA

Reports about possible cases of canine circovirus abound, but it’s important to keep the facts in perspective, according to American Veterinary Medical Association experts and others. “Circovirus has been found in the feces of healthy dogs,” notes veterinarian Thomas Mullaney of Michigan State University. “Also, the initial research shows that nearly 70% of dogs showing clinical signs of illness and found positive for circovirus were also infected with other viruses or bacteria known to cause disease.” According to the AVMA, circovirus is no longer under consideration as the primary cause of sickness in dogs in Ohio, and just one of those dogs tested positive for circovirus. The Journal Gazette (Fort Wayne, Ind.)

Preventing obesity starts with pet owners

Issues relating to what we eat are in many cases similar to concerns about what our pets eat.

“There definitely is a link,” says Dr. Karyl Hurley, director of Global Scientific Affairs for Mars Petcare, who helped organize the Waltham International Nutritional Sciences Symposium.

Similarly, according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, just over half the dogs in America are overweight or obese, and about 60 percent of cats. The parallels to people include a long list of medical repercussions. Just one example is the sharp increase in diabetes among dogs and cats, according to the Banfield State of Pet Health 2011 Report. Read entire story…

There are several ways we can help our pets fight obesity. 50% of pets in the U.S. are overweight, and a lot of that comes from over-treating. One dog biscuit can have up to 50 calories, so the weight can really add up fast! Selecting the right treats is just as important as selecting the right pet food, especially for pets who need to lose weight.

To give your pet the healthiest snacks, look for treats that are:
- Low in calories- less than 10% of your pet’s diet
- Not table scraps, which are often high in fat and hard to digest
- Made with natural ingredients
- Made in the U.S.A. to ensure quality

A dog treadmill can give your dog a great workout regardless of weather or environment, allowing you to maintain a consistent exercise regimen. A treadmill provides increased muscle definition, toning, improved vitality, increased life span and can help curb destructive behavior or excess energy often associated with the lack of regular exercise. Dog treadmills provide a way for you to exercise your pet even when the weather is bad or it is inconvenient to take them out for a walk.