Separation Anxiety in Dogs

Dogs are pack animals and social creatures. They form strong attachments to other dogs and people. With an increase in those who are gone for long hours and have a busy schedule, it’s important to help your dog stay alone. It is critical that your dog understand that your absences are tolerable and temporary.

Separation anxiety occurs in the first hour of your dog being left alone. Keep in mind that your dog’s dependence on you is significant, and it is likely to cause anxiety when you leave. Although this might be flattering, it’s not fair to your dog to be so stressed by your absence. Signs of separation anxiety occur when your dog is prevented from being close to you. Like people, dogs cannot stay in an uncomfortable state of anxiety for too long, and will resort to doing anything to reduce the tension.

Here are some circumstances in which separation anxiety can occur:

  • Too strong of an attachment to one person.
  • Separation from his mother and littermates.
  • Owners who let their dog follow them wherever they go and who bring their dog everywhere they go.
  • A very exciting departure and welcome.

Here are some signs of dogs trying to reduce their separation anxiety:

  • Destruction, digging, chewing, or excessive vocalization.
  • Hyperactivity, depression, or aggression.
  • Diarrhea/vomiting, urination/defecation.

How to help you and your dog cope:

  • If all else fails, ask your veterinarian about drug therapy. A good anti-anxiety medication shouldn’t sedate your dog, but simply reduce his overall anxiety.
  • Take your dog to a doggie day care facility or kennel when you have to be away.
  • Leave your dog with a friend, family member, or neighbor when you’re away, or use a pet sitter.
  • Take your dog to work with you, if possible.
  • Use a pet door in conjunction with an invisible fence so your dog can get out of the house and run around. This will help him burn off some energy and anxiety..

How to treat separation anxiety:

  • Ignore your dog when leaving.
  • Mix the leaving routes (the back door, garage, and so on).
  • Practice false departures.
  • When you return, be as calm as possible. Do not display any excited behavior or rewards.

What won’t help:

  • Punishment. Punishment isn’t effective for treating separation anxiety and can make the situation worse.
  • Another dog. Getting your dog a companion usually doesn’t help an anxious dog because his anxiety is the result of his separation from you, and not just the result of being alone.
  • Crating. Your dog will still engage in anxiety responses inside a crate, and he may urinate, defecate, howl, or even injure himself in an attempt to escape. Instead, create other kinds of “safe places” for your dog.
  • Obedience training. While formal training is always a good idea, separation anxiety isn’t the result of disobedience or lack of training.

Here are some other tips:

  • Leave clothes with your scent on them around the house.
  • If your dog is left outside, hang an old bike tire, a bunch of dish rags knotted together, or a shoe from a tree so that your dog can play with them. Do not use a leash or tie-out, this can injure your pet when you are gone. It is better to use an underground dog fence or wireless dog fence to contain your dog safely.
  • Put the radio on a talk station and leave it on while you’re gone. The noise muffles any other kinds of sounds your dog might worry about and it’s comforting. He hears the same sounds as when you are home.

It’s not fully understood why some dogs suffer from separation anxiety and others don’t. But it’s essential that you be as understanding as possible of your dog’s behavior. He needs your help with finding the best solution to alleviate the tension of your being gone and of him being alone.

Dogs Working in Haiti

The rescue efforts in Haiti wouldn’t be possible without the work of search dogs. That’s a fact. Every day, TV news programs show video of dogs sniffing through the rubble for the sounds of people breathing or calling out for help.

One dog, a Border Collie named Hunter, and his firefighter owner, Bill Monahan, located three girls who had been trapped alive in the devastating earthquake. They were combing through an area near the Presidential Palace when Hunter detected the survivors’ scent under four feet of rubble.

Hunter alerted Monahan using a “bark alert,” and a rescue crew from California Task Force 2 dug out the girls and provided them with immediate first-aid.

Hunter and Monahan were trained by the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation, a nonprofit organization that partners rescued dogs with firefighters and trains them to find survivors from natural disasters.

Hunter and Monahan did great work in Haiti. Another reason we love dogs so much.

Train Your Dog Fast With Innotek Dog Training Collars

Innotek IUT-300 series shock collarsToday, we are learning more and more about training hunting dogs using the relatively new technology called electronic dog training collars. These collars have changed the way that working dogs are trained, especially hunting dogs.

One of the most significant values of the electronic training collar is that it allows full interaction between the trainer and the dog and can even be used remotely while your dog is doing his work.  Let us evaluate how these collars work and why they are so effective.

Electronic training collars consist of two parts: transmitters and receivers.  The transmitter is the hand-held unit and is controlled by the trainer while the receiver is worn on the dog’s collar.  Correcting a dog at home, in the field hunting, or during a show—is done by sending a signal from the trainer’s transmitter that sends a light static correction to the dog through the collar.  These corrections are light and do not harm the dog, but they do distract the dog, which corrects bad behavior.    This quickly increases the training pace.

When you are searching for an effective electronic training collar for your dog, you want one that is reliable and safe.  Innotek Pet Products is the premier electronic dog training collar supplier.  Whether you need a backyard system that allows you to train more than one dog or you want a simple system to train your pet at home, Innotek has a product that will meet your needs.

In addition to the high quality, Innotek products offer long-term durability.  Innotek Ultra Smart Training Collars also offer a variety of options including 15 levels of stimulation, allow for multiple dogs to be trained and options to use sound as well as electronic reminders for your dog.

Innotek UltraSmart training collars provide the best value through the IUT 300 series.  This system is ideal for those who need to train two dogs at once and at a distance.  These collars have a range of up to 300 yards.

Thanks to the IUT300 collar, you can enjoy unique features like self-diagnosis, electronic fit testing, battery strength indicator, built-in receivers, as well as lithium-ion technology which is not available in other collars. With up to nine levels of stimulation, this training collar is one of most function collars out there for trainers looking to train with sound reminder or electronic stimulation.

Extra-long probes for long-haired dogs are also available as well as lanyards, test lights, and instructional DVDs.  Innotek is committed to ensuring that you and your dog get the most from their products when training.

Greyhound Training

The following article is about do’s and don’ts in the field of greyhound care and greyhound dog training tips. But a good thing to keep in mind is that not all those adopting will need this article; in fact, some do not have experience the usual issues at all! On the contrary, some are simply blown away by the breed’s simplicity, laidback temper, and quiet disposition.

But in order to reach such a near-ideal stage, potential grey owners need to know the facts. Rehomed Greys live most of their young, active years in a crate eighteen hours a day. So it’s no metaphor that this breed needs to be assisted to feel familiar and secure in the home.

But is there any way to know if a dog is feeling particularly stressed? Just some of the signals that a dog will send to say it is not relaxed is a dripping nose, diarrhea, sweaty paws, whining, panting and restlessness. But owners must not get bogged down by these details; keep working on gaining the dog’s trust, and in three to five days the dog’s stable personality will show, and it will trust you. The following ideas are the essentials in greyhound training.

1. Keep the lines of communication open with the Greyhound

If owners want to get better in taking care of their dog, they will need to understand how racers think and respond.

For example, a few trips to the dog’s rescue group will reveal that Greys tend to be skittish and wary of very new things in their environment, and to makes matters more complicated, rehomed greys are pressured to learn new things while living with their adopters. What owners can do is to present new experiences from positive and enriching angles.

When other dogs get frustrated, they turn noisy and restless; not so the Grey. It will turn rigid, watching. At this point when the dog refuses to absorb anything, an owner does well in backing off and giving the dog breathing space.

Another “Greyhound” thing to know is that they startle easily and will steam full-speed away from the perceived threat. Be careful about properly securing your grey with a good-fitting greyhound collar and a strong leash.

2. Keep in mind that Greyhounds are students forever.

This means all of the dog’s waking hours, and all of the events in the dog’s day, are moments that it absorbs things and learns. Try to take advantage of all these moments to teach the dog something.

But what’s to be done with the Grey that keeps on doing something that’s a no-no? An observer of this will need to figure out how this negative actions is being unwittingly “approved” and “condoned,” especially if by you! Naturally, if an owner wants the dog to do good, he/she will need to check out how to reward that instead.

3. Owners must put up a winning relationship.

Training is of course, far beyond obedience and manners. At its core and heart, training is establishing a good relationship and keeping the “lines of communication” open.

Note that Greys learn a lot from a human’s actions and moods. If there’s a way to wear out the dog in the bad sense, it would be through harshness and through making the dog think you’re unhappy with it. A grey in statue mode is unhappy and is fed up with how things are.

And a last greyhound training note regarding canine sensitivity: especially malicious and unsavory events may leave a deep scar, so keep control over situations that may scare the dog. There are a number of dog training collars that will help you with properly training your Greyhound.

Territory Showdown!

When your dog isn’t behaving the way you want, it’s important to correct, and not punish him. You may think you’re giving him a “time out,” but all he knows is that you made him sit in the corner for five minutes. Unlike a child, they don’t connect the “punishment” to the bad behavior. When you correct a dog, you immediately alert them that what they’re doing is wrong and then you show them an alternate, acceptable behavior. Dogs live in the now! They understand the most immediate cause and effect. And there is no better situation to correct your dog than when they are showing signs of being territorial.

If your dog is acting territorial, it is likely that they were never given rules, boundaries, or limitations. When you move into a new home, you should show your dog which areas he is allowed into and which ones he isn’t. Take your dog for a good long walk, and then enter the house, walking him through the rooms where it is okay for him to be. For the rooms where the dog is not allowed, you should claim the doorway or entrance. Show him that that room belongs to you. Don’t allow him in, and stay there until he backs away. Then he will see, “This is a room I shouldn’t go in.” If you set these rules, boundaries, and limitations in the very beginning, and reinforce them every day, the dog will obey. If the dog tests the boundaries, just deliver a quick correction and show the dog what you want.