You Need to be There for Your Dog’s Training

People who send their dogs to be trained without their participation don’t appreciate that they are disrupting part of their connection with their dog. Even if you have the thousands of dollars it costs for a professional to train your dog in obedience, YOU still need to be trained in what this dog will have been taught.

A professional trainer needs to teach you body posture, different tones of voice, hand signals, and so on. Training your dog is not something you can “phone in.”

This article is courtesy of RadioFence.com a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars.

Dog Agility Training

Dog agility is a competitive dog sport that takes place within an obstacle course. Dogs are trained to make jumps, travel through tunnels, and navigate various walkways – all in a specific order. Each step of the way, the dogs are directed by their owners. Agility is an excellent form of exercise and mental stimulation, making it ideal for high energy dogs like Border Collies and Australian Shepherds. However, just about any dog can participate in agility. The intensity and difficulty of the course can be altered to accommodate dogs with health complications or special needs. Teamwork between dog and human is the cornerstone of this sport. Learn more about agility training equipment. It could be a great activity for you and your dog.

This article is courtesy of RadioFence.com a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Doors, Bark Collars and Dog Training Shock Collars, Pet Supplies.

Timing Rewards is Everything When Training

You probably don’t realize that when your dog sits for you, there are only a couple of seconds in which to give a reward or your dog won’t know that the reason she got the cookie was for sitting. We have to be quick on the draw with our positive reinforcement to show our dog that what she did was what we wanted. Dogs learn by association – and generally they relate any event with what happens immediately before or after it. This means you need to give a reward virtually during the execution of the behavior you wanted or instantly afterwards.

Training Your Dog

Training a dog can be a very rewarding. Most of us have seen a dog on television do a cute trick but have looked over at our pooch and wondered why he will not even fetch a ball. It is not him, it is the owner.

Training a dog to do what we want requires discipline. The basic dog psyche wants to please his or her master. Most professional dog trainers advise starting off slowly and working up from there.

First, you need a dog training collar to help with the basic commands. These commands are: sit, lie down, stay and stop or come. Your dog must be able to obey you.

After you have mastered the basic commands, it is time to play. Training experts say that it is important for a dog to enjoy his play. Drug sniffing canines are taught how to search out drug stashes through the use of a favorite toy. They are trained by the act of playing. Of course, they are also well disciplined but training dogs to do important jobs also can be fun for them.

Training show dogs is a little different than teaching your animal to sit, stay or roll over. This is one area dog training that requires the dog be impeccable.

As the trainer you are expected to know the hundreds of little rules that can cause a dog to win or lose the competition. The length of coat, the dog agility, and the teeth are but a few of the items that judges look at.

If your dog show training pet skills are not up to par, there are still competitions your animal can be entered into. One that strikes humor in many is the Ugliest Dog competition. The phrase “a face only a mother could love” is absolutely true where some of these dogs are concerned. Bald and wrinkled or hairy and bug-eyed, all types of dogs make this competition.

Training skills require study and many hours of practice. It is part of training your dog to do what you want it to. It does not have to be all work though. You can train your dog to be your own personal star.

He or she can fetch your paper or be trained to catch a Frisbee; the choice is up to you. The most important thing is to have fun with your friend and enjoy each other’s company.

Separation Anxiety in Dogs

Dogs are pack animals and social creatures. They form strong attachments to other dogs and people. With an increase in those who are gone for long hours and have a busy schedule, it’s important to help your dog stay alone. It is critical that your dog understand that your absences are tolerable and temporary.

Separation anxiety occurs in the first hour of your dog being left alone. Keep in mind that your dog’s dependence on you is significant, and it is likely to cause anxiety when you leave. Although this might be flattering, it’s not fair to your dog to be so stressed by your absence. Signs of separation anxiety occur when your dog is prevented from being close to you. Like people, dogs cannot stay in an uncomfortable state of anxiety for too long, and will resort to doing anything to reduce the tension.

Here are some circumstances in which separation anxiety can occur:

  • Too strong of an attachment to one person.
  • Separation from his mother and littermates.
  • Owners who let their dog follow them wherever they go and who bring their dog everywhere they go.
  • A very exciting departure and welcome.

Here are some signs of dogs trying to reduce their separation anxiety:

  • Destruction, digging, chewing, or excessive vocalization.
  • Hyperactivity, depression, or aggression.
  • Diarrhea/vomiting, urination/defecation.

How to help you and your dog cope:

  • If all else fails, ask your veterinarian about drug therapy. A good anti-anxiety medication shouldn’t sedate your dog, but simply reduce his overall anxiety.
  • Take your dog to a doggie day care facility or kennel when you have to be away.
  • Leave your dog with a friend, family member, or neighbor when you’re away, or use a pet sitter.
  • Take your dog to work with you, if possible.
  • Use a pet door in conjunction with an invisible fence so your dog can get out of the house and run around. This will help him burn off some energy and anxiety..

How to treat separation anxiety:

  • Ignore your dog when leaving.
  • Mix the leaving routes (the back door, garage, and so on).
  • Practice false departures.
  • When you return, be as calm as possible. Do not display any excited behavior or rewards.

What won’t help:

  • Punishment. Punishment isn’t effective for treating separation anxiety and can make the situation worse.
  • Another dog. Getting your dog a companion usually doesn’t help an anxious dog because his anxiety is the result of his separation from you, and not just the result of being alone.
  • Crating. Your dog will still engage in anxiety responses inside a crate, and he may urinate, defecate, howl, or even injure himself in an attempt to escape. Instead, create other kinds of “safe places” for your dog.
  • Obedience training. While formal training is always a good idea, separation anxiety isn’t the result of disobedience or lack of training.

Here are some other tips:

  • Leave clothes with your scent on them around the house.
  • If your dog is left outside, hang an old bike tire, a bunch of dish rags knotted together, or a shoe from a tree so that your dog can play with them. Do not use a leash or tie-out, this can injure your pet when you are gone. It is better to use an underground dog fence or wireless dog fence to contain your dog safely.
  • Put the radio on a talk station and leave it on while you’re gone. The noise muffles any other kinds of sounds your dog might worry about and it’s comforting. He hears the same sounds as when you are home.

It’s not fully understood why some dogs suffer from separation anxiety and others don’t. But it’s essential that you be as understanding as possible of your dog’s behavior. He needs your help with finding the best solution to alleviate the tension of your being gone and of him being alone.