The Causes Of Dog Barking

Do you ever use the keyword “the causes of dog barking”? Do you know what type of prospect might perform a search on that term? Comparatively few have ever thought much about it. Possibly millions of people have bothered by dog barking, however. They may searched for solutions obliquely in some manner. But most pass by not conscious of the need to explore this issue and continue on their current path of a noisome dog and increasing frustration!

So just what is the real truth here? Exactly what is truth behind the causes of dog barking? Why would any person care?

Let’s take a take a look at seven Reasons why you may possibly want to learn a lot more about the causes of dog barking.

First, it may simply be that your dog is bored. In fact, this is the most frequent cause of dog barking. O.K.I can surely understand your position that this goes to the “cause” of dog barking, but does not help me understand how to “stop” dog barking. As we will discuss in this article, the key is to learn how to control, not stop, that irritating behavior in your dog. And yes, that is a valid observation. But if viewed from the proper perspective, you will soon see that when engaging in some dog training techniques, it is important to realize why the dog reacts to a particular stimulus in a certain way. It is also important to realize that if boredom is the cause, exercise is often the remedy. If you’re currently exercising your dog, perhaps you should simply increase the amount of exercise that your dog is able to obtain. Furthermore, give thought to the fact that as you increase your dog’s level of exercise, you not only decrease the amount of barking, but you also are likely to improve your dog’s overall health.

Second, another very common cause is anxiety. The reason for that is certainly that your dog feels abandoned upon your departure. It is important that you teach your dog how to deal with those times when you and your dog have to be separated. It is also important that your dog realize that this time may be actually calming for it. Yes, this may be a very tedious process, but it is certainly well worth your efforts.

Third, another frequent reason for this behavior is that the dog is attempting to warn you of some impending danger or threat. Remember, this is from the dog’s point of view, not necessarily yours. In fact, many of these threats and fears that your dog perceives may be nothing more than thunder, wind blowing, etc.

Fourth, your dog may engage in this behavior simply because the dog is seeking attention. If it is obvious that your dog is barking simply to gain your attention, you should never respond to that behavior. If you do so, this will merely reinforce it.

Fifth, your dog may engage in this behavior simply because it is frightened or startled. In some instances, a dog will bark simply because it is confused at what is happening in its environment. Many dogs, like people, seek security. When your dog is confused, it feels insecure and frightened. If this occurs, the dog is very likely to begin barking.

Sixth, it may simply be a display of playfulness. It is not uncommon for dogs that want to play to begin barking to express their excitement. If so, this is a completely natural behavior. This is certainly not a behavior that should be punished or discouraged. (This naturally assumes that the dog is not becoming overly aggressive when at play.).

Seventh, dog barking may be a means of the dog simply attempting to communicate something. Dogs certainly bark to communicate with each other. In many instances, the dog is merely attempting to establish its presence around other dogs. Once again, this is a normal behavior, but should not be allowed to continue for protracted intervals!

After you have seen all of the reasons and had an opportunity to evaluate them, it really is up to you to decide whether or not the case for knowing more about the causes of dog barking is a compelling one or not.

Just maintain an open mind and look at the reasons. Perhaps you really ought to know more about the causes of dog barking. This may very well be the most critical step in controlling this!

Learn more about obtaining assistance with dog barking. Stop by our site where you can find out all about the benefits of obtaining dog training tips and how they can help you with your “best friend.”

Potty Training Puppies–Essential Success Tips

Who else wants to know the secret to house training your puppy? The secret is that there really is no big secret. Here is how it works: You need patience, you must be persistent, and you must be firm but gentle. House training your puppy properly will set the stage for an unbreakable, loving bond with your puppy.

It may very well be that the idea of house training your puppy makes you shudder and cringe at the thought of yourself sopping up rivers of pee and worse. For many, the mere utterance of the word, “potty training” sends them running for high ground. You don’t have to be among their number if you understand the key elements of housebreaking your puppy.

How long does it take to before you have a potty discipline puppy? Experts say–and my own experience confirms this–that you should see consistent results in two to three weeks. However, professionals also warn that it may take two to three months without the dog eliminating before the job is truly accomplished.

If there is a secret to housebreaking your puppy, if there is one, single fundamental that you must keep in mind, it is this: routine. Dogs are creatures of habit, and a predictable routine helps make your dog feel secure. For that reason, you want to make your training the same and follow an exact, unvarying regimen.

The key basics to house training your puppy include the following: set a routine and do not change it; take your puppy outside to go to the bathroom once every one or two hours; establish a schedule for feeding and do not change it; accompany your puppy outside ten to fifteen minutes after feeding; praise your puppy when it eliminates outside; accidents are bound to happen inside–never show anger when this occurs; and last, thoroughly clean the areas inside where the puppy has made a mess.

These steps alone are key to new puppy training. If you adhere to the house training tips set forth above in a firm and loving manner, you will not only successfully potty train your puppy, you will be well on the way to sound relationship with your pet.

House training your puppy for health and happiness.. How to get the most out of puppy training techniques–start today!

What To Do When Your Dog Begs For Table Scraps

Like most people, dogs love food. They’re willing to sacrifice their dignity in order to obtain it. If food is not given freely, but instead eaten in front of them, they will beg. Some will do so relentlessly.

A begging dog can be particularly frustrating for his owner. He’ll sit and stare longingly at his owner’s plate, hoping to receive a tasty morsel, regardless of size. Unfortunately, many people acquiesce under the pressure, and give their pets table scraps just to send them away. This is a bad idea for a number of reasons.

Below, we’ll explain the side effects table scraps can have on your canine; you’ll learn the reasons you should avoid providing them. We’ll also describe a few methods you can use to discourage the behavior, so you and your family can eat in peace.

Reasons To Avoid Feeding Your Pet Table Scraps

Commercial brands of dog food are specially formulated with the nutrients your pet needs to stay healthy. The vitamins and minerals contained in these brands are necessary for whatever stage of development your canine is in. Table scraps rarely provide the same level of nutrition. Instead, they usually deliver excess calories, which are likely to cause weight problems for your pet. And that leads to avoidable health issues.

Another reason to avoid giving your dog table scraps is because doing so can lead to digestive problems. Even though your pet will eat anything placed in front of him, his body may be unable to tolerate some types of food.

Also, given a steady diet of people food, your canine may eventually become fussy with his own meals. He’ll essentially acquire a taste for the foods you feed your family. And that’s when his begging will begin to take on a new level of urgency.

Preventing Access To Your Table

This method removes your pet’s opportunity to beg. You can use a couple of different approaches depending on whether you would like your canine to remain in the room in which you’re eating, or to stay out.

If you’d like his company in the room, place a lead and collar on him, and secure him to a nearby chair or other piece of furniture. He should be kept far enough away from the table to minimize the temptation to beg. Consider providing a chew toy to give him something to do while you and your family eat.

You can also bar him from the room, which can be done easily with a pet gate. Confine your dog to a room elsewhere in your home, so he’s unable to watch you eat through the gate. This will prevent him from whining to gain your attention.

Sending Him Elsewhere

This method requires more time and patience since there is training involved. The goal is to give your dog something to do elsewhere in your home without confining him to that particular space. You’ll need to train him to stay in his space while you and your family enjoy meals.

At first, your dog will be tempted to abandon his designated spot, and come looking for table scraps. Over time, however, you can teach him to remain there, thereby preventing him from begging.

This method has the added benefit of being helpful in other circumstances. For example, suppose you’re entertaining guests, and would like to prevent your canine from bothering them. Simply instruct him to go to his designated space while your guests are visiting. As long as he has a few toys to occupy his attention, he’ll be fine.

When your dog begs, he does so because he has an expectation his begging will produce results. This is the reason owners who have given in to their canines in the past find it difficult to curb the behavior. But it’s never too late. Use the methods above to turn your begging pooch into a patient, pleasant companion.

Key Tips To Teaching Your Puppy To Come

One essential key to teaching your dog to come, or doing any basic puppy training routine, is to allow the puppy no alternative but to obey the command. Non-compliance can never be an option. What this means for you is that you must set your dog up for success and when doing any kind of dog training, give it the opportunities it needs to succeed. A common error when teaching “come” or any other command is to use it when you do not really want the dog to perform the action. In the case of “come,” you want to use the word only when you really want to dog to cease any other action and come to you. This also means that you have to learn how to monitor yourself a bit when your puppy is within hearing range.

I’d like to recount one example of how my own dogs picked up a phrase and ran with it and what the consequences were. The phrase in question is, “Let’s go.” My dogs like to ride in the back of my car, and I like to take them out with me. I rather carelessly started saying “Let’s go” before putting them into the car with the result that every time they heard me utter, “Let’s go,” they would leap up and race each other to the door in expectation of a ride. Fortunately, this was not a bit problem–more humorous than anything else–and I was able teach them out of that habit.

With particular respect to the “come” command, it is important to not give your dog the choice of not coming. Thus, a very basic way of starting out is to always have your dog on a leash. I recommend a leash of at least 3 or 4 feet. Attach the leash to the dog’s collar and position him (or her) at one end and you at the other. I also advise that you do not use a choke or pinch collar for this. Say the command, “come” in a firm, civil voice and then very gently tug the leash so as to encourage the dog to approach you. It is important to use only the minimum force necessary. After the dog comes to you, give it lots of praise and a small, tasty treat.

Next, create only positive associations with the word “come.” When you tell your dog to “come,” you want it to want to come. Ideally, this should be something it looks forward to doing for you. For that reason, try to avoid saying, “come,” when the consequence might be something unpleasant, such as grooming or giving the dog a bath. For some reason, my dogs have come to look upon bathing as punishment so I have to be careful with the choice of words I use. However, these days, when they see the shampoo, they put their tales between their legs voluntarily come over to be hosed off and cleaned.

In situations where you discover your dog behaving badly, your first impulse may be to say “come” in a somewhat angry voice to get it to stop misbehaving. If possible, take positive, corrective action, but do not associate “come” with the correction. It is difficult to always remember exactly what to do in stressful situations, but as much as possible, create in your puppy’s mind only positive associations with your command words.

Another effective tip is to always take advantage of times when the puppy happens to be moving toward you. You can leverage this to your training advantage by saying, “come” and then letting the puppy do what it is doing naturally. And of course you give it lots praise. A trick that can work with a young puppy (6 to 8 weeks) is to put it on a leash with plenty of slack. Toll a toy a small distance away and let the puppy run to get it. When the puppy has the toy, tell it to “come” and then gently tug it in your direction, and reward it with generous praise and occasionally with a treat. This is almost as easy as it sounds, and your dog will love learning how to please you!

Learn exactly what you need to know about training your puppy to come! Find out how to make the most of key puppy training techniques right now!

Identifying Different Types Of Canine Aggression

Dog Training ProductsOf all dog behavioral issues, aggression is the one that most frustrates owners. It is very common, though canines display signs for very different reasons. Many owners observe hostile behavior in their pets, but are unaware regarding its trigger. Consequently, they are uncertain about how to respond.

First, it’s important to realize that aggressive behavior is natural to dogs. Though most are domesticated, they remain pack animals, and perceive the world around them accordingly.

Second, in order to properly address hostility in your canine, you must first be able to identify the different types of aggression. Once you can determine the trigger, you’ll be better prepared to “cure” the problem.

With this in mind, we’ll provide a brief overview of the most common reasons dogs become antagonistic. The following descriptions will offer a springboard from which you can remedy the problem.

Protect The Family

As pack animals, canines have traditionally protected those within their group from assailants. If an intruder threatens one member, the others will respond quickly to protect him or her.

In your home, your dog considers you and your family to be members of his “pack.” If he feels you, your family, or other pets under your roof are threatened by a perceived attacker, he will behave aggressively to warn the attacker away. The problem is, many canines become overly-protective, and consider any person outside their “pack” to represent a potential threat.

Protect The Home

Similar to guarding their families, dogs also guard their territories. If an intruder approaches their den, they will respond with hostility to discourage that person or animal from coming closer.

Your canine considers your home to be his den, and will respond aggressively to any person or animal he feels to be a threat. Here, too, he may become overly-protective of his home. If he does, he will treat everybody aggressively, even those you consider friends. Interestingly, this type of aggression is very rare in puppies since they have not yet learned to protect their “dens.”

Stemming From Fear

Canines react to elements that frighten them in the same way as humans: they retreat. However, if retreat is not an option, they will fight. In the wild, if a pair of wolves approach a dog, the dog will initially seek a path that provides him an escape route. If, however, such a path is unavailable, he will turn to face the wolves, despite his fear.

Fear aggression is dangerous. If a person unwittingly corners a canine, that person risks being bitten. Thus, always provide an unfamiliar dog a route through which he can escape.

Guard Possessions

Dogs are hard-wired to protect their possessions. While this trait stems from the need to fight for food outside the human-canine relationship, it has carried over to today’s pets. For example, when a person or animal approaches a dog’s food bowl, he may bare his teeth and growl to communicate his ownership.

Within your home, your canine may express possessive behavior over his food, toys, and even the area in which he likes to rest. This may become a problem if visitors – either people or animals – stumble upon your pet’s possessions without realizing they have done so.

Hierarchical Order

Dogs have always functioned within groups according to their understanding of their pack’s hierarchy. As long as they know – and accept – those ranked above and below them, there is minimal conflict. Conflict arises when there is a bid for authority within the group.

This latter problem occasionally happens between canines and their owners, families, and other pets. The dog will compete for authority, and act aggressively when others confront him.

Canine aggression can only be addressed successfully after the behavior’s trigger has been identified. If you’re having difficulty doing so, consider working with your veterinarian or a professional trainer.

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