Toilet Training Cats Is Easy

Most of us take toilet training cats for granted: Most kittens seem to learn with very little help from their owners, particularly if you have the mother or another cat in the home to teach them. Even if you don’t, most felines seem to be magnetically drawn to the litter box with very little urging from you.

There are however some instances when a kitten won’t take to their litter box and instead may find a houseplant, or worse yet your carpet. Not catching problem behavior quickly might mean your cat will develop a habit of going wherever they please.

Creating a private environment – This is an important first step when toilet training cats. Many of us need privacy to do our business, yet don’t give our animals the same respect. Most dogs are quite happy urinating, or having a bowel movement with the whole town staring at them.

Cats are a little different in most cases and plenty of cat owners out there will tell you how their cat will make a quick exit from their litter box when someone enters the room. Put the litter box in a room where your kitten will have some privacy to sniff around their box and get comfortable (litter boxes with a top enclosure are also ideal).

Lock the door. This doesn’t mean permanently locking your kitten in a room and throwing away the key. Rather, if you can put your kitten alone in a small room with their litter box they will have much less opportunity to explore other areas to do their business. After they’re used to it and use the box frequently, you can move the box wherever you wish. Usually one or two days in a room with their box is all they need to become comfortable with their litter box.

Declaw No – Scratching Post Yes!

The issue of declawing has been a hot one for about 20 years now. The main reason for declawing is to stop a cat from scratching furniture, people and priceless rugs. There is no medical reason to declaw a cat, though, and the declawing removes the front of the toe which can affect a cat’s balance.

It’s simpler and more humane to teach your cat some claw manners instead. Set up scratching posts around the house, including the hanging kind which you can attach to the the couch. Use catnip to attract your cat. You can also teach your cat to leave the furniture alone and to keep her claws in when a person is holding her. It just takes a repetitive “No!” when the claws come out and treats when she obeys. A little time training is a much better alternative.

Indoor Cats Get Fleas Too!

You may think your cat will never become dinner for fleas but a surprising number of indoor-only cats have problems.

Since cats are fastidious groomers, the fleas may go unnoticed until you see your cat doing lots of scratching or you notice some hair loss due to bite allergies. If you have a dog who goes outside, even if he’s on flea prevention he stands of chance of being a flea carrier. You can also bring fleas in on your pants or socks. Another way they gain access is through the window screen, especially if your cat enjoys sitting by a first-floor window.

To do a flea check, place your cat on a white towel and brush. If you see black specks (flea debris) then it’s time to get some flea control.

Can Your Waste Basket Kill Your Cat?

If you don’t think of the waste basket in your bathroom as anything to worry about as far as a cat is concerned, think again!

Dental floss is a form of string, and we know that cats cannot resist playing with it. Once they put it in their mouths, their natural instinct is to swallow, and what goes down cannot come back up.

There may also be razor blades, or safety razors, but once in the paws of a curious cat they no longer represent “safety;” they pose serious danger.

Keep your waste basket secure and check for any other items that may be dangerous to your cat.

How To Get Rid Of Fleas On Your Cat

Fleas are a problem for cat owners all year round but spring is when they’re at their worst. It is important to treat fleas as they can pass-on disease and in some cases course an allergic reaction.

It has been estimated that the average household contains in the region of 20,000 flea eggs at any one time, which will develop into adult fleas in a matter of weeks! Fleas increase numbers so readily, that just 200 fleas will become ten thousand in a matter of six months.

To stop a flea problem becoming an infestation you need to treat your cat and it’s surrounding area. So what treatments are available to you?

Off the shelf flea treatments:

The main types of treatment available for the treatment of your cat, spot-on remedies, collars, ‘electric shock’ combs, sprays and tablets. The type of remedy you use will largely depend on your cat:

One of the easiest methods to use are flea collars. They’ll be able to protect your cat for up to four weeks. Even so, some owners are uncomfortable having collars on cats.

Spot-on drops are a very effective treatment, protecting your cat from fleas for up to 5 weeks. Some brands offer two types, one for cats or one for dogs, so make sure you get the right one, as a cat can be overdosed using the dog formula.

Electronic combs is a flea comb that emits a mild electric shock, enough to kill the fleas it comes in contact with, but that is harmless to your pet. The benefit here is that no chemicals are involved, but you will need to be thorough with the comb and it can miss the eggs, so you’ll have to keep repeating the process for it to be effective. There is also a slight buzzing noise when it “zaps” a flea that may put off some cats.

Flea sprays are a relatively inexpensive way to treat fleas, but cats need to be over three months of age and be pretty tolerant of the ‘hissing’ noise. Your cat will also need to be placid enough to sit still while you make sure the job is done thoroughly.

Oral Tablets will kill all the fleas on your pet, but it can be difficult to get your cat to swallow a pill unless your well practiced!