Pet Beds

It used to be that beds for dogs were fairly uncomplicated things. You could put down a rug, a folded blanket, or a pile of old towels in a corner or close to the fireplace, and that was it. But pet beds have come a long way since those days.

Occasionally folks don’t have a special mattress for their dog, but let it sleepwith them on their own mattress. Or from time to time dog crates double as beds for the night. But others want their dogs to have something distinctive, and you will discover some fascinating and fun versions of these beds out there. Dog beds might be as utilitarian or as elaborate as you would like them to be. In most cases, your dog won’t really care, unless it is a option between a uncomplicated mat on the floor or a memory foam mattress that gives aching joints a bit of relief. If you want your dog to sleep at the foot of your mattress, or it really likes that rug close to the fireplace, then you might not need to have anything special. But you can find some real cool dog beds, and many pet owners really go for unusual designs.

While there are  many choices for to find bed that makes your dog happy, heated dog beds increase you options with the many shapes and styles available.  Some dogs prefer this type of bed. My dog loves to sprawl on the bed so an open style is best for me. There are hundreds of choices for dog beds to accommodate our different styles and choices. You should have no problem finding what you and your dog need and something that will fit with your home decor.

February is National Pet Dental Health Month

February is here, and that means it’s National Pet Dental Health Month. It can be easy to overlook your dog’s oral health on a day-to-day basis. This campaign is a great reminder to take care of your dog’s teeth now and all year round.

Oral hygiene is an essential part of caring for your dog. Many people think “doggie breath” is inevitable. In reality, halitosis is a sign of an oral problem. Dental disease causes discomfort and can lead to loss of appetite, weight loss, and systemic diseases. Prevention is the cornerstone of canine dental health. Daily home care is essential, but dogs also need a professional cleaning about once a year (give or take depending on the dog). February is a great time to visit your vet for an oral exam and cleaning, as many offer discounts in honor of National Pet Dental Health Month. Regardless of the month, remember to keep those pearly whites sparkling.

Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire Terriers, affectionately known as “Yorkies,” offer big personalities in a small package. Though members of the Toy Group, they are terriers by nature and are brave, determined, investigative and energetic. They have long, luxurious blue and tan coats. This portable pooch is one of the most popular breeds according the AKC® Registration Statistics.

A Look Back
Named for the English city from which they originally hail, Yorkshire Terriers were used in the nineteenth century to catch rats in clothing mills. Surprisingly enough, in its beginnings, the Yorkie belonged to the working class, especially the weavers; in fact, facetious comments were often made about how the dogs’ fine, silky coats were the ultimate product of the looms. Eventually, the breed left the workforce and became a companion animal to families of European high society.

Right Breed for You?
Yorkies are easily adaptable to all surroundings, travel well and make suitable pets for many homes. Due to their small size, they require limited exercise, but need daily interaction with their people. Their long coat requires regular brushing.

Colors
Puppies are born black and tan and are normally darker in body color, showing an intermingling of black hair in the tan until they are matured. Color of hair on body and richness of tan on head and legs are of prime importance in adult dogs, to which the following color requirements apply: Blue: Is a dark steel-blue, not a silver-blue and not mingled with fawn, bronzy or black hairs. Tan: All tan hair is darker at the roots than in the middle, shading to still lighter tan at the tips. There should be no sooty or black hair intermingled with any of the tan.

Separation Anxiety in Dogs

Dogs are pack animals and social creatures. They form strong attachments to other dogs and people. With an increase in those who are gone for long hours and have a busy schedule, it’s important to help your dog stay alone. It is critical that your dog understand that your absences are tolerable and temporary.

Separation anxiety occurs in the first hour of your dog being left alone. Keep in mind that your dog’s dependence on you is significant, and it is likely to cause anxiety when you leave. Although this might be flattering, it’s not fair to your dog to be so stressed by your absence. Signs of separation anxiety occur when your dog is prevented from being close to you. Like people, dogs cannot stay in an uncomfortable state of anxiety for too long, and will resort to doing anything to reduce the tension.

Here are some circumstances in which separation anxiety can occur:

  • Too strong of an attachment to one person.
  • Separation from his mother and littermates.
  • Owners who let their dog follow them wherever they go and who bring their dog everywhere they go.
  • A very exciting departure and welcome.

Here are some signs of dogs trying to reduce their separation anxiety:

  • Destruction, digging, chewing, or excessive vocalization.
  • Hyperactivity, depression, or aggression.
  • Diarrhea/vomiting, urination/defecation.

How to help you and your dog cope:

  • If all else fails, ask your veterinarian about drug therapy. A good anti-anxiety medication shouldn’t sedate your dog, but simply reduce his overall anxiety.
  • Take your dog to a doggie day care facility or kennel when you have to be away.
  • Leave your dog with a friend, family member, or neighbor when you’re away, or use a pet sitter.
  • Take your dog to work with you, if possible.
  • Use a pet door in conjunction with an invisible fence so your dog can get out of the house and run around. This will help him burn off some energy and anxiety..

How to treat separation anxiety:

  • Ignore your dog when leaving.
  • Mix the leaving routes (the back door, garage, and so on).
  • Practice false departures.
  • When you return, be as calm as possible. Do not display any excited behavior or rewards.

What won’t help:

  • Punishment. Punishment isn’t effective for treating separation anxiety and can make the situation worse.
  • Another dog. Getting your dog a companion usually doesn’t help an anxious dog because his anxiety is the result of his separation from you, and not just the result of being alone.
  • Crating. Your dog will still engage in anxiety responses inside a crate, and he may urinate, defecate, howl, or even injure himself in an attempt to escape. Instead, create other kinds of “safe places” for your dog.
  • Obedience training. While formal training is always a good idea, separation anxiety isn’t the result of disobedience or lack of training.

Here are some other tips:

  • Leave clothes with your scent on them around the house.
  • If your dog is left outside, hang an old bike tire, a bunch of dish rags knotted together, or a shoe from a tree so that your dog can play with them. Do not use a leash or tie-out, this can injure your pet when you are gone. It is better to use an underground dog fence or wireless dog fence to contain your dog safely.
  • Put the radio on a talk station and leave it on while you’re gone. The noise muffles any other kinds of sounds your dog might worry about and it’s comforting. He hears the same sounds as when you are home.

It’s not fully understood why some dogs suffer from separation anxiety and others don’t. But it’s essential that you be as understanding as possible of your dog’s behavior. He needs your help with finding the best solution to alleviate the tension of your being gone and of him being alone.

How Often Does Your New Puppy Need to Go Out?

The rule of thumb is that a puppy can hold her urine for the number of hours that correspond to her age in months, plus one. So a two month old puppy can hold it for three hours (2+1). Keep in mind this is the maximum time she can hold it but she may feel the urge before that. If you are unable to let your puppy out at the required time, you may want to consider using a dog crate to protect your carpeting and other belongings.