A Man and His Dog Travel the Country to Explore What Makes Us So In Love With Dogs

Today is National Read A Book Day! And I’ve decided my next read is going to be Travels With Casey. This book is about the experience Benoit Denizet-Lewis and his dog Casey have when they jump into an RV and set out to travel across the United States.

The funny thing is how honest Benoit is about why he decided to do this – he was worried his dog Casey didn’t like him very much! What started out as a road trip designed to help Benoit bond with Casey turned into something worth writing about – a 13,000 mile journey across 32 states that taught Benoit and Casey so much about what our relationship with our dog tells us about ourselves and our values.

The description of the book sounds too great to pass up: “On the way, Denizet-Lewis—known for his deeply reported dispatches from far corners of American life—falls in love, convinces himself that his RV is infested with bed bugs, and meets an irresistible cast of dogs and dog-obsessed humans. Denizet-Lewis and Casey hang out with wolf-dogs in Appalachia, search with a dedicated rescuer of stray dogs in Missouri, enter a dock-jumping competition in Florida, meet homeless teens and their dogs in Washington, spend a full day at a kooky dog park in Manhattan, sleep in a Beagle-shaped B&B in Idaho, get pulled over by a K9 cop in Missouri, and visit “Dog Whisperer” Cesar Millan in California. And then there are the pet psychics, dog-wielding hitchhikers, and two nosy women who took their neighbor to court for allegedly failing to pick up her dog’s poop.” Sounds like a must-read to me!

I can’t wait to start reading Travels with Casey! If you have read it and want to share your thoughts on the book, please comment :) Or if you have any other books you would love to recommend please share!

Check out Travels With Casey’s Facebook Page here.

Vet Shocked to Find 43.5 Socks Inside a Dog’s Stomach

Vet Shocked to Find 43.5 Socks Inside Dog's Stomach - blog.radiofence.com

A three-year-old Great Dane in Portland, Oregon was rushed to the DoveLewis emergency animal hospital after his owners realized he was vomiting and suffering from extreme pain. An x-ray revealed “a stomach full of a large quantity of foreign material.” He was rushed into surgery, and two hours later Dr. Ashlee Magee was shocked by what she discovered: 43.5 socks inside the dog’s stomach! The dog made a full recovery, however the socks did not.

Vet Shocked to Find 43.5 Socks Inside Dog's Stomach - blog.radiofence.com

The animal hospital’s spokeswoman, Shawna Harch, told news reporters that “it’s perhaps the strangest case in the hospital’s history and certainly the record set for the most socks eaten.” She said the owners were unavailable for comment, and she couldn’t release their names.

Now that I think about it… would you notice if 22 pairs of your socks were missing? Do you even own 22 pairs of socks? I certainly don’t!

The vet hospital heard of a contest hosted by Veterinary Practice News which is a magazine for vets. The contest has been going on for nearly 10 years and is called “They Ate WHAT?” To enter, vets had to submit an x-ray and case details. DoveLewis vet hospital came in third place and won $500! They are using the money for a fund to help low-income families pay for vet bills.

I would love to hear from you! Have your pets eaten anything they shouldn’t have or have they needed surgery? Comment below :)

Dog Saves Her Owner After They Were Hit by A Car

Dog Saved Owner After They Were Hit By A Car - blog.radiofence.com

John Miles owes his life to his devoted Husky/Beagle Mix named Lucy. They were taking their typical routine walk when they were both hit by a car which left John laying in the road unconscious. Lucy suffered a torn ACL and fractures but managed to limp to the closest business and cry outside for help until someone heard her and followed her as she led them to where John was laying in the road.

Lucy is the perfect example of how selfless, devoted, and naturally good-hearted dogs are.

Important Dog Food Recall Notice

On Tuesday August 26 Pedigree released a voluntary notice of a recall of 22 bags of Pedigree Adult Complete Nutrition dry dog food because of “the possible presence of a foreign material.” Pedigree knows that the affected bags were only 15 pound bags sold in Dollar General stores in Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Louisiana. Pedigree believes that there are “small metal fragments” that may “present a risk of injury if consumed.” However they claim the metal fragments are not “embedded in the food itself.” They are working with Dollar General to get the bags removed from inventory to ensure they are not sold to consumers.

If you have purchased a 15 pound bag of Pedigree Adult Complete Nutrition dry dog food from a Dollar General in any of those four states, you can examine the bag to see if yours is one included in the recall. Affected bags have the lot code “432C1KKM03″ printed on the back near the UPC code (23100 10944) and “Best Before 8/5/15″ date.

Pedigree Recall Information from blog.radiofence.com

Pedigree says that no other dog food bags are affected by this recall. If you have any friends or family with dogs that might be affected by this recall, please help by sharing this post via social media so as many people are informed of this as possible.

965 Dogs Dead Presumably From Trifexis

965 Dog Deaths Presumably Caused By Trifexis - blog.radiofence.com

965 Dog Deaths Presumably Caused By Trifexis - blog.radiofence.com

Trifexis – the FDA approved monthly medication created to prevent fleas and heart worms for dogs – may not be safe according to more than 965 people who suspect that their dogs have died from the drug.

Trifexis reports on its website that “to receive FDA approval Trifexis was tested in hundreds of dogs, and detailed clinical reports were submitted for intense review. Adverse events are reported to the FDA, and concerns are thoroughly investigated.” Side effects listed for Trifexis include: vomiting, itching, lethargy, diarrhea, dermatitis, skin reddening, decreased appetite, and pinnal reddening.

Preventative Vet has put together an excellent article concerning the allegations against Trifexis by looking at both sides of the issue. Preventative Vet’s answer to people’s question “does Trifexis kill dogs?” is that “there is currently a suspicion, though no conclusive proof, that there may be some significant safety problems with one of the most popular heartworm preventatives — Trifexis. It appears as though these concerns are being taken seriously and are currently under investigation by the appropriate people and agencies.” 

Speaking from experience, I gave my dogs Zoey and Jem Trifexis after they were both out of the puppy stage as their first flea/heartworm medication. Zoey had the most trouble with the drug.

When she first started taking Trifexis, I was using it strictly as a preventative rather than a “cure” for any pre -existing conditions. She was young and didn’t have a single case of fleas or heart worm problems, but I knew it was important to take precautions. As soon as she started taking Trifexis, I noticed a very severe change in her stool almost immediately. Her stool had this milky white slimy membrane over it which I had never seen before. I was very concerned. The vet examined her and said it was probably a side effect from the Trifexis, and it was not something I needed to worry about (but of course any dog mom is going to worry!) I decided to follow the vet’s advice and give her another dose of Trifexis the next month (the problem with her stool only seemed to last the first two days after taking it). I was very strict about giving her doses exactly when they were due to keep her as protected as possible from fleas or heart worm.

We moved into a rental home with a large back yard, and the previous owners had cats. I began to suspect she had fleas even though she had been taking Trifexis to prevent them. A visit to the vet confirmed that she did in fact have her first case of fleas! I was shocked, disappointed, and felt gipped. I thought I was doing the right thing by giving her Trifexis to prevent fleas, and then she got them anyway as if the product hadn’t worked at all. After the scary side effect she experienced with her stool and a case of the fleas, it was easy for me to make the decision to take her off of Trifexis without any regrets. Since she has been off of it, she has never had that problem with her stool again and has been 100% flea-free. She now receives a heart worm shot from her vet twice a year that lasts 6 months, and I give her K9 Advantix because she spends lots of time in the woods where we have seen ticks.

The most popular news story covering this topic can be viewed below:

Only you can make the choice when it comes to deciding which flea and heart worm preventatives are best for your family’s dog. Having said that, I think it is extremely important that we all do our own research and understand as best we can all of the options out there and learn from the experiences of others. If Trifexis is causing other peoples’ dogs to have problems and many of them suspect it is the cause of death for their precious pups, then you might decide to air on the side of caution and think carefully before giving it to your dog.

On the other hand, I completely agree with Preventative Vet’s advice on this Trifexis dilemma when they say that “while the investigation is ongoing, you shouldn’t panic and you shouldn’t jump to conclusions – especially if your dog has been safely on Trifexis for some time now. However, If you do decide to change preventatives — which is your right and there are lots of other effective medications out there for you and your veterinarian to choose from — you should be sure to do so only with the counseling and input of your veterinarian.” Couldn’t have said it better myself!