Can Your Waste Basket Kill Your Cat?

If you don’t think of the waste basket in your bathroom as anything to worry about as far as a cat is concerned, think again!

Dental floss is a form of string, and we know that cats cannot resist playing with it. Once they put it in their mouths, their natural instinct is to swallow, and what goes down cannot come back up.

There may also be razor blades, or safety razors, but once in the paws of a curious cat they no longer represent “safety;” they pose serious danger.

Keep your waste basket secure and check for any other items that may be dangerous to your cat.

Harness or Collar – What’s Best?

Used imprpperly collars can do damage to your dog’s neck (including the trachea, esophagus, and more) over the years. An easy way to prevent the damage is to attach your dog’s leash to a harness instead of a collar.

If your dog pulls a lot on his leash, you can buy a training tool such as an Easy Walk Harness or a Gentle Leadeer Head Collar and use that tool on walks while you teach your dog to walk more nicely. (Be sure to follow the instructions when using training tools like these.) Once your dog understands how to walk politely on leash, you can remove the training tool and simply walk your dog in a regular body harness.

You Must Do This When Dog Training

Is there a secret to dog training? No, not really. But there is one foundation skill that can make everything else come much easier: getting eye contact from your dog in a variety of settings. Practice getting sustained (at least a few seconds) eye contact from your dog in different places, either in response to her name or to a cue like “Watch me!”

Hartz Real Beef Treats Recall

SECAUCUS, N.J., Sept. 3 /PRNewswire/ — The Hartz Mountain Corporation is voluntarily recalling one specific lot of Hartz Naturals Real Beef Treats for Dogs due to concerns that one or more bags within the lot may have been potentially contaminated with Salmonella. Hartz is fully cooperating with the US Food and Drug Administration in this voluntary recall.

Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems, all of whom are at particular risk from exposure and should avoid handling these products.

Salmonella symptoms may include fever, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and nausea in both dogs and humans. Anyone experiencing the symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek immediate medical attention. Owners of dogs exhibiting these symptoms should also seek veterinary assistance.

Hartz Mountain Corporation is recalling 74,700 8-oz bags of Hartz Naturals Real Beef Treats for Dogs, lot code BZ0969101E, UPC number 32700-11519, which were imported by Hartz from a Brazilian supplier, Bertin S.A., and which were distributed to a number of customers in the United States. While regular testing conducted by Bertin (prior to shipment to the US) did not detect the presence of Salmonella in any packages of this product, random sample testing conducted by FDA did indicate the presence of Salmonella. Hartz is aggressively investigating the source of the problem.

Although Hartz has not received any reports of animals or humans becoming ill as a result of coming into contact with this product, Hartz is taking immediate steps to remove the product from all retail stores and distribution centers. Dog owners having purchased this product should check the lot code on their bag, and, if the code is not visible, or if the bag has lot code BZ0969101E imprinted thereon, they should immediately discontinue use of the product and discard it in a proper manner.

Consumers can contact Hartz at 1-800-275-1414 at any time with any questions they may have and for information on how to obtain reimbursement for purchased product.

Contact: Hartz Consumer Affairs

Airedale Terrier

The Airedale Terrier was named for the valley of the Aire in England, the place where the breed most likely originated. The Airedale was developed from similar terriers that are now extinct. Before the breed evolved into today’s Airedale, it was called the Waterside or Bingley Terrier.

Airedales were originally bred to be versatile working dogs. They were skilled hunters, reliable messengers, and dutiful guard dogs. In fact, they have been used all over the world for their abilities. Airedale Terriers were first registered with the AKC in 1888.

Size: 40-65 pounds
Colors: Black and Tan & Grizzle and Tan

Health Problems:

Responsible breeders strive to maintain the highest breed standards as established by kennel clubs like the AKC. Dogs bred by these standards are less likely to inherit health conditions. However, some hereditary health problems can occur in the breed. The following are some conditions to be aware of:

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus

About the Breed:

The Airedale Terrier is the largest of the terriers – often called the “King of Terriers.” This breed is highly energetic and brave with a square, sturdy build and deep chest.

Airedales are smart and protective dogs that must be trained properly. An unsocialized, unruly Airedale can be quite difficult to live with. However, with patience and consistency, the Airedale can become a very obedient, trustworthy companion. Though Airedales can be excellent family dogs, most do best with older children (and after proper training).

Airedales have unique hair coats, including a wiry top coat with a softer undercoat. The breed is known to be a low-shedder. Because of their coarse, curly hair, much attention must be placed on proper grooming, including regular haircuts and brushing.

The high energy level of the Airedale makes serious exercise a requirement. The more activity, the better for this breed. Airedales benefit from plenty of physical and mental stimulation. This, along with a healthy diet and routine veterinary care will help keep your Airedale healthy for many years.