Fireworks and Dogs Do Not Mix

The 4th of July is Just a few days away, and that means fireworks. Many owners underestimate their dogs when it comes to fireworks. The truth is, even the bravest dogs can become terrified by the sound of fireworks. The most important thing you can do for your dog is to keep her away from fireworks displays. If you plan to go see fireworks, do your dog a favor and leave her home. If fireworks can be heard near your home, keep her indoors for the evening. Continue reading

A Tip for Cooling Down Your Dog

Stores that sell clothing for construction and roadway workers also often sell cooling bandanas or fabric neckbands filled with water-absorbing crystals. Next time you buy one for yourself, either for work or just to get you through the summer days, buy one for your dog.

Soak it and then tie it gently around the neck of a large dog or wrap and tie it around the back and chest of a small dog just behind the front legs. Now and then, refresh it with your water bottle and the two of you should be good to go on a hot day.

Symptoms of a Flea Infestation

The summer months are prime time for fleas, which thrive in the heat. And if untreated, they can lead to tapeworms and other diseases.

Symptoms of an infestation can include:  Severe itching that causes a skin rash, legions and possibly ulcers,  dermatitis, and scratching and biting at the inflamed area on the skin. Flea attacks are most common on your dog’s, head, neck and tail.

The symptoms of fleas appear suddenly and range from very mild to severe. Be on the lookout for fleas crawling through your dog’s fur, particularly in your dog’s skin folds. Adult fleas are flat with 3 pairs of legs, brownish in color and 2 – 8mm long. Also look for “flea dirt” (excrement) in your dogs bedding and skin

Summer Camp – For Dogs!

Summer is here, dog lovers, and you know what that means: it’s time to pack up the car and take your pooch to summer camp.

Doggie summer camps are for real, folks, and their level of intensity ranges from day camping and hiking events with like-minded owners to kennel-free boarding at a pet “ranch” to the full-on summer camp experience with you and your pooch taking part in swimming lessons, costume contests and handicrafts.

Here are a several options you can either take advantage of this summer or go ahead and book for 2011.

Sleepaway Camp for Your Dog
For those who fear that their dog is getting a little too citified — or just need to travel without their pet — the Double Dog Ranch offers a service you might describe as adventure boarding. Think of this as a doggie dude ranch where your pup can romp around in the woods while you take a much-needed vacation to the beach. Or if your dog needs a little tutoring in the obedience department, these guys can help out with that too.

The Double Dog Ranch has two locations, one in Northern Oregon and the other in Southern California. For booking info, you can check their available dates online. They’re updated daily. Rates begin at around $40 a day.

A Camp That Caters to You and Your Dog
Just as camps for kids get booked up, so do canine camps. But if you are looking for a summer 2011 destination, consider Canine Club Getaway. This is one of the most hands-on camp experiences available to you and your dog. Canine Club Getaway is one part summer camp, one part dog-friendly resort. In fact, the camp is held at a scenic resort property in Lake George, N.Y.

But just because you’re not roughing it doesn’t mean you don’t get that classic summer-camp experience. Canine Club Getaway provides a smorgasbord of activities for dogs and owners such as “Barks and Crafts,” “Red Light Green Light,” “Guided Hikes,” and even “Doggie Weddings” (not legally binding in most states). “Last year, we had two dogs that were going to breed,” Costa tells Paw Nation, “So we had a little costume party ceremony. It was really fun and it was presided over by our staff Ph.D.”

Rates for summer 2011 start at $1,099 for a single room. If you are looking for a fall getaway, keep checking the camp’s website. Costa says that they’ve “been kicking around the idea of another event in October.” See a video of the camp below.

Day Camping and Hiking with Your Dog
Want to get in on some of this awesome dog camping, but don’t have the time for a week-long summer camp? The Dog Scouts of America might be the place to go for a slightly more introductory-level camping situation. Plus, you can meet like-minded dog owners in your area.

The Dog Scout motto is “Let us learn new things, so that we may become more helpful.” Who doesn’t want their dog to be more helpful? Maybe they can teach your dog how to start a campfire, or at least how to fetch you a cold beverage out of the cooler.

Troops are cropping up all over the nation, and offer dogs and owners the chance to bond over activities like backpacking, day camps, and of course earning merit badges.

Courtesy of RadioFence.com, a Leading Internet Retailer of Pet Supplies including Pet Gates, Dog Training Shock Collars and Bark Collars.