Nationwide Recall for Pet Carousel Beef Hoof and Pig Ear Dog Treats

The following recall alert, from Pet Carousel, Inc., is an update to an FDA health alert:

Pet Carousel has initiated a recall of all Pig Ears and all varieties of Beef Hoof pet treats because the products may be contaminated with Salmonella. The problem was discovered after FDA testing found positive results for Salmonella in pig ears and beef hoof products.

These products were recalled because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. Salmonella can affect both humans and animals. People handling dry pet food and/or pet treats can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the treats or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella may experience some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Although rare, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments including arterial infections, endocarditis (inflammation of the lining of the heart), arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their health care provider immediately.

Pets with Salmonella infections may become lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may only experience a decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed any of the affected products or is experiencing any of these symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately.

The following products have been recalled: The affected pig ear products were packaged under the brand names Doggie Delight, Pork Tasteez and Pet Carousel
Item No.:

* 18100-P Bulk
* 18016-P 10-pk red mesh bag
* 18120-P 20-pk red mesh bag.

The affected beef hooves were packaged under the brand names Choo Hooves, Dentley’s, Doggie Delight, and Pet Carousel
Item No.:

* 1506-K 5 lb. bulk
* 1507-K 10 lb. bulk
* 1520-K 20 lb. bulk
* 12125-T 10-pk vinyl bag
* 12110-T 10-pk, vinyl bag
* 12111-T 10-pk, vinyl bag
* 12122-T 10 lb., bulk
* 1503-K 3-pk, vinyl bag
* 1510-K 10-pk ,vinyl bag
* 1405-S 5 lb., bulk
* 1408-S 10-pk, vinyl bag
* 1410-S 10 lb., bulk
* 1420-S 20 lb., bulk
* 90058-H Cheese/& Bacon Stuffed Hoof, bulk
* 90056-H Peanut Butter Stuffed Hoof, bulk
* 17005-R Rope toy with Hooves.

The products were distributed nationwide in both bulk and retail packaging for sale in pet food and retail chain stores throughout the country. All sizes and all lots of these pork ears purchased on or after 08/16/2009 and all beef hoof products in all varieties purchased on or after 09/16/2009 made by Pet Carousel are included in this alert.

Pet Carousel has completed notifying its consignees and requested the consignees return affected products and remove them from retail sales. Out of an abundance of caution and concern for public safety, Pet Carousel is issuing this press release to inform consumers of potential risks and to ensure that all affected product has either been returned or otherwise removed from use.

Consumers who have purchased the products described above should cease use and return the product to their place of purchase. Additionally, consumers with questions may contact Pet Carousel at 800-231-3572 from 8:00am to 4:00pm PST.

Thursday is National Dress Up Your Pet Day

 Oh, the humiliation…I know it may come as a shock — there is a Dress Up Your Pet Day. I kid you not!

Be aware that Jan. 14 is National Dress Up Your Pet Day. Yes, some twisted human managed to get a day devoted to this. I realize  that a lot of you actually don’t seem to mind getting dressed up. Some of you even seem to like it. Or maybe you’ve just given up trying to fight the inevitable.

 Even cats are not immune

The only good thing about National Dress Up Your Pet Day is that it’s not just for dogs. It’s for cats, too! And if there’s anyone who hates getting dressed up more than I do, it’s cats.

This Thursday, at dawn, all pets should bring a few treats into the bathroom and lock themselves in. Stay there until Friday. Trust me. An ounce of prevention is worth years of cure. At least until Thursday. Now go run and hide!

Greyhound Training

The following article is about do’s and don’ts in the field of greyhound care and greyhound dog training tips. But a good thing to keep in mind is that not all those adopting will need this article; in fact, some do not have experience the usual issues at all! On the contrary, some are simply blown away by the breed’s simplicity, laidback temper, and quiet disposition.

But in order to reach such a near-ideal stage, potential grey owners need to know the facts. Rehomed Greys live most of their young, active years in a crate eighteen hours a day. So it’s no metaphor that this breed needs to be assisted to feel familiar and secure in the home.

But is there any way to know if a dog is feeling particularly stressed? Just some of the signals that a dog will send to say it is not relaxed is a dripping nose, diarrhea, sweaty paws, whining, panting and restlessness. But owners must not get bogged down by these details; keep working on gaining the dog’s trust, and in three to five days the dog’s stable personality will show, and it will trust you. The following ideas are the essentials in greyhound training.

1. Keep the lines of communication open with the Greyhound

If owners want to get better in taking care of their dog, they will need to understand how racers think and respond.

For example, a few trips to the dog’s rescue group will reveal that Greys tend to be skittish and wary of very new things in their environment, and to makes matters more complicated, rehomed greys are pressured to learn new things while living with their adopters. What owners can do is to present new experiences from positive and enriching angles.

When other dogs get frustrated, they turn noisy and restless; not so the Grey. It will turn rigid, watching. At this point when the dog refuses to absorb anything, an owner does well in backing off and giving the dog breathing space.

Another “Greyhound” thing to know is that they startle easily and will steam full-speed away from the perceived threat. Be careful about properly securing your grey with a good-fitting greyhound collar and a strong leash.

2. Keep in mind that Greyhounds are students forever.

This means all of the dog’s waking hours, and all of the events in the dog’s day, are moments that it absorbs things and learns. Try to take advantage of all these moments to teach the dog something.

But what’s to be done with the Grey that keeps on doing something that’s a no-no? An observer of this will need to figure out how this negative actions is being unwittingly “approved” and “condoned,” especially if by you! Naturally, if an owner wants the dog to do good, he/she will need to check out how to reward that instead.

3. Owners must put up a winning relationship.

Training is of course, far beyond obedience and manners. At its core and heart, training is establishing a good relationship and keeping the “lines of communication” open.

Note that Greys learn a lot from a human’s actions and moods. If there’s a way to wear out the dog in the bad sense, it would be through harshness and through making the dog think you’re unhappy with it. A grey in statue mode is unhappy and is fed up with how things are.

And a last greyhound training note regarding canine sensitivity: especially malicious and unsavory events may leave a deep scar, so keep control over situations that may scare the dog. There are a number of dog training collars that will help you with properly training your Greyhound.

New Hampshire Moves to Make Antifreeze Less Dangerous to Pets

Several years ago a California state legislator made news with a gimmick. He invited school children in his Bay Area district to enter a contest through his office. Each entrant would draft a desired state law. The winning entry would be submitted to the state legislature for a vote.

When I first heard of the contest I thought it was silly. But the winning entry was brilliant. It required that antifreeze sold in California be made to taste bitter. The bill was submitted to the legislature, where it passed. Later it was signed into law.

The result has been a dramatic decrease in antifreeze toxicity in pets (and, I imagine, children) in California.

Antifreeze contains a compound called ethylene glycol. This chemical has a sweet odor and taste. It is attractive to pets and children.

When it is consumed, ethylene glycol initially causes the poisoned individual to feel drunk. However, the body metabolizes the chemical into products that clog the kidneys and lead to kidney failure. Ethylene glycol is one of the most toxic chemicals in common use.

Several other states now have laws similar to California’s. These include Virginia, Oregon, Washington, New Mexico, Arizona, Tennessee, and Maine.

And, if the New Hampshire House of Representatives gets its way, that state will be next to join the list.

That, of course, is good news. But I have to wonder why this simple, common sense proposal is spreading slowly state-by-state rather than through federal action.

Ten Commandments for a Responsible Pet Owner

  1. My life is likely to last 10-15 years. Any separation from you is likely to be painful.
  2. Give me time to understand what you want of me.
  3. Place your trust in me. It is crucial for my well-being.
  4. Don’t be angry with me for long and don’t lock me up as punishment. You have your work, your friends, your entertainments. But I have only you.
  5. Talk to me. Even if I don’t understand your words, I do understand your voice when speaking to me.
  6. Be aware that however you treat me, I will never forget it.
  7. Before you hit me, before you strike me, remember that I have teeth that could easily crush the bones in your hand, and yet I choose not to bite you.
  8. Before you scold me for being lazy or uncooperative, ask yourself if something might be bothering me. Perhaps I’m not getting the right food, I have been in the sun too long or my heart might be getting old or weak.
  9. Please take care of me when I grow old. You too will grow old.
  10. On the difficult journey, on the ultimate difficult journey, go with me please. Never say you can’t bear to watch. Don’t make me face this alone. Everything is easier for me if you are there. Because I love you so.

Take a moment today to thank God for your pets. Enjoy and take good care of them. Life would be a much duller, less  joyful thing without God’s critters. Please pass this on to other pet owners.